A Monster ate my Fatty

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  • A Monster ate my Fatty
  • jodafett
    Member

    Any one know where this is

    Why, are you lost?

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    somewhere probably very close to a scruffy northern town where vandals go out and spray paint over the English countryside 🙂

    Premier Icon singletracksurfer
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    Tsk, Banksy on holiday.

    Premier Icon mattjg
    Subscriber

    somewhere probably very close to a scruffy northern town where vandals go out and spray paint over the English countryside

    wish they hadn’t

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    No idea, but that’s awesome!

    yunki
    Member

    That’s bloody brilliant that is..!! 😀

    Upon this fair isle there are (approx) 627 456 789 lumps of old rock we can go and look at if we are of an inclination to marvel at lumps of old rock..

    I don’t see the need to be relentlessly precious about each and every one of them..

    Premier Icon trout
    Subscriber

    Any one know where this is

    Premier Icon trout
    Subscriber

    Its on`t moors above the tourist hot spot of Keighley

    twoniner
    Member

    Thats brilliant, thanks for posting. Must show my daughter.

    Upon this fair isle there are (approx) 627 456 789 lumps of old rock we can go and look at if we are of an inclination to marvel at lumps of old rock..

    And there wasn’t a single one that was just like that before it was graffiti’d. I’m all for a bit or urban art but would prefer it to be kept urban.

    yunki
    Member

    that’s very nice dear

    some other urbane art

    monkeychild
    Member

    That’s brilliant! Need to see this first hand 🙂

    Premier Icon Simon
    Subscriber

    Like that, where exactly is it?

    What will archeologists of the future make of that?

    Premier Icon njee20
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    I like that!

    that’s very nice dear

    some other urbane art

    30,000 year old prehistoric cave paintings and amusingly sited but poorly executed rattle can monster graffiti are not the same thing.

    My issue with adding the monster graffiti to the rocks is that for me the rural parts of the country provide an escape from people and from built up environments of town and city living. That is a big part of the attraction or riding a mountain bike, for a couple of hours I can get away from it all and into a different, less scarred environment. The monster graffiti on the rocks wrecks that escapism in exactly the same way that a pile of discarded cans or food wrappers does.

    I don’t expect everyone to agree, it is after all quite a funny monster, but I think it detracts from the landscape.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
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    I’m not a great fan of graffitti, but that is art IMO.

    Premier Icon trout
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    Simon – Member
    Like that, where exactly is it?

    growinglad
    Member

    Mis-read that map, thought, “Don’t tell me there’s a place in England called Monster C**k……”

    Shame…..think I’d have to move there just to use the address!.

    As for the ROCK….think it’s quite cool….it will still be there long after the paint has gone…..

    Premier Icon Simon
    Subscriber

    Cheers Trout, I might take the kids up for a look.

    Premier Icon mattjg
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    ^^ seems spray can oiks CBA to walk more than 50 metres from the road

    millions of years in the making, that piece of rock, and a couple of hours for an idiot to **** it up

    Premier Icon luffy105
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    It will be weathered off in a year or two and then will again be a rock in a field. Personally I would much rather kids with a modicum of talent got onto their bikes and rode into the countryside and painted a few teeth on a rock in their spare time rather than hung around in groups doing nothing, getting bored and possibly getting into trouble. It looks amusing and there is no lasting damage

    timc
    Member

    The paint wont last forever people…

    Premier Icon DezB
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    Oh my precious wocks! I must hug them all and keep them safe fwom vandals!

    yunki
    Member

    but I think it detracts from the landscape.

    millions of years in the making, that piece of rock, and a couple of hours for an idiot to **** it up

    ok..

    I really do see your point, but you I think you need to get some perspective..

    my point is that a gazillion other landscapes are available, and regardless of that, humans are as much a part of nature as rocks are..

    And the wally that reckons the rock is **** up..? That paint is a blink of an eye on the great timescale of things, the rock really won’t notice

    30,000 year old prehistoric cave paintings and amusingly sited but poorly executed rattle can monster graffiti are not the same thing.

    don’t be daft

    Craggyjim
    Member

    Ah, the monster midge of Ardtoe.

    Superficial
    Member

    I like it.

    Coming down off Higger Tor towards surprise view there’s a rock that looks like a dinosaur / loch ness monster. Someone’s carved a mouth / eye into the rock, always makes me smile. I’m not sure how anyone can really be offended by this.

    Premier Icon Clobber
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    how you liking the fatty trout?

    yunki
    Member

    are ‘teh offended’ as upset by cairns, stone circles and the like..?
    what about sculptures that have been made elsewhere and then placed into a rural environment..?

    Is it the fact that the work is modern?
    In a modern medium..?
    Or that it’s not sanctioned and approved by committee?
    Or just that new art doesn’t belong outside of a certain radius of built up areas? which just takes us around in a circle..

    Admittedly, I personally, as a graffiti writer/artist since the early 80s immediately found the images slightly shocking because of the context.. But if you engage your brain slightly and ignore your pre-programmed knee jerking, it’s actually rather good..

    It’s apparently near a touristy spot, so there will be kids there, and I think it’s a very engaging way of getting more of them to consider the history and timescale of the geology, which could very well be a good thing

    I would be upset if this became a a trend, but it would be utter madness to hold every single last individual natural feature of our environment as sacred

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    What about this graffiti?

    Premier Icon mattjg
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    I find the monster quite creative and humorous actually, but I’d much prefer it hadn’t been done.

    This guy makes artwork in the environment https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christo_and_Jeanne-Claude

    he photographs it then takes it away and restores the location to how he found it.

    I don’t like the monster because I much prefer the look of bare rock anyway, I think our outdoor spaces are more precious than several of you folks do and should be left alone as much as possible (while accommodating reasonable access and use), and I also resent that, in effect, the perpetrators have imposed their decision on everyone else without consideration of how other users of the space may feel about it. That’s pretty arrogant really. I think it’s important that one person’s use and enjoyment of a space shouldn’t detract from another’s, as much as possible. And it’s certainly possible not to graffiti rock outcrops.

    I don’t accept the comparison with chalk figures, henges etc. They were done by different people living in very different eras and environments.

    It’s also a shame one can’t express a contradictory opinion here without attracting personal sarcasm and insults.

    But I should have known better.

    Premier Icon Simon
    Subscriber

    the tourist hot spot of Keighley

    For anyone that doesn’t know the area this bit was a joke…

    maxtorque
    Member

    I Liked it.

    Yunki, so many questions, I’ll try and answer them as honestly as I can.

    are ‘teh offended’ as upset by cairns, stone circles and the like..?

    No, I believe they had a purpose and meaning beyond mild amusement.

    what about sculptures that have been made elsewhere and then placed into a rural environment..?

    Again, most sculptures or outdoor art installations tends to provoke thought, the monster is the opposite. It removes the thought process and shouts ‘look at this rock looking like a monster’ I’ve no doubt several people over the years will have looked at the rocks on that site and gradually seen the image of the monster in their mind. That gradual process of discovery has been lost for a generation. It’s too obvious.

    Is it the fact that the work is modern?
    In a modern medium..?
    Or that it’s not sanctioned and approved by committee?

    No, none of those things bother me particularly, I’ve seen some great non sanctioned art over the years in a variety of mediums in a variety of locations.

    Or just that new art doesn’t belong outside of a certain radius of built up areas?

    I don’t really think that this is good enough to be called art, but that’s very much a personal opinion and can’t really hold water beyond my own definition of quality. But the main point i was trying to make previously was that when i get out into the countryside i like to imagine that i am further from other people than in reality I ever can be in most parts the UK and coming across that painted on a rock face would shatter that temporary illusion as It’s the sort of thing that I associate with and expect to see in urban environments.

    Premier Icon D0NK
    Subscriber

    30,000 year old prehistoric cave paintings and amusingly sited but poorly executed rattle can monster graffiti are not the same thing.

    the only difference is 30,000 years. if it was “dave loves sharon” or just a tag or something equally rubbish I’d not be too impressed but that’s amusing.

    klumpy
    Member

    If you wouldn’t find it on the front of a box of fudge, it shouldn’t be in the countryside – no exceptions!!

    (Well, except mountain bikes. One assumes.)

    Superficial
    Member

    I also resent that, in effect, the perpetrators have imposed their decision on everyone else without consideration of how other users of the space may feel about it. That’s pretty arrogant really. I think it’s important that one person’s use and enjoyment of a space shouldn’t detract from another’s, as much as possible. And it’s certainly possible not to graffiti rock outcrops.

    Problem is that if you listen to everyone who has opinion (especially in these nu-media days where things like this are photographed, posted on forums and instantly globalised) you’ll inevitably find someone who doesn’t like it. And if you always listen to them, then you end up with lowest-common-denominator dross that entertains no one.

    A bit of ‘arrogance’ by a few people makes the world a far more colourful place. Is banksy arrogant? What about Anthony Gormley (link)? Or is that OK because it was (presumably) sanctioned by a council committee?

    Premier Icon mattjg
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    not so superficial, I’m meaning in the place where it was done.

    take music as an analogy. if people want to go to a club somewhere and shake their heads to death metal, power to them. not my cup of tea but I hope they enjoy it. but if they wanted to set up their stacks in a park or beach and impose it on the locals and anybody who came past, I’d say that’s not reasonable.

    I quite like that Gormley link BTW. and they can presumably be removed. the rock-monster is, in effect, permanent, within the bounds of human lifespans.

    Premier Icon amedias
    Subscriber

    well I like it 🙂

    I think it’s fun, and interesting, and probably not an image that would have sprung to my mind so I’m grateful for the artist/perp for drawing my attention to it, which I guess was the point…

    Would be even better if they had gone at it with tools and carved the teeth/features, but I imagine that would have upset even more people.

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