• This topic has 452 replies, 73 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by kerley.
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  • 6.8 kg road bike
  • Premier Icon benman
    Free Member

    An extra kilo or two on a road bike is huge. My aluminium bike is only about 700g heavier than my carbon one, and I can feel the weight difference on a climb. I guess some of this depends on the weight of the rider though (I’m pretty light)

    Being quicker downhill on a road bike doesn’t really matter a jot (unless you’re racing :). Downhills are generally a tiny proportion of a road ride, and unless you are in the alps, they are over within 5 mins max. Whereas you might spend a couple of hours pedalling uphill…

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Full Member

    An extra kilo or two on a road bike is huge.

    Once you get over a certain point it is significant, but I’m not so sure about 7kg vs 8kg.

    What that certain point is depends on the individual, but I wouldn’t really be happy with a 10kg+ road bike personally.

    Premier Icon twisty
    Full Member

    Once you get over a certain point it is significant, but I’m not so sure about 7kg vs 8kg.

    What that certain point is depends on the individual, but I wouldn’t really be happy with a 10kg+ road bike personally.

    A Kilo is a Kilo, it makes a difference in the number of seconds it takes to TT an ascent but not one that is significant to the experience of an average rider – it isn’t going to enable you to complete different riding routes or keep up with with different category of riders.

    I remember last year this guy turned up to a UCI stage race with a sub 5kg bike. He had to tape a heavy hammer to his bike to get past the bike check for the TT on the first day.
    On the 2nd day the hammer had disappeared, didn’t stop him dropping off the back of the pelo on one of the first hills of the day, conversely my old 9kg bike didn’t stop me from keeping in the group on the climbs.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    An extra kilo or two on a road bike is huge.

    I went out the other week for 100k and forgot to take any bottles, defintely noticed it on the hills, the bike felt quite spritely!

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    Anything under 8 kilos is a decent weight and you’ll struggle to notice much difference over any ridden circuit. your bodyweight will fluctuate by about this much from ride to ride. As will the volume in your water bottles.

    10 kilos is heavy, even with disks, 9 kilos is disk territory, 8 kilos is rim brakes and/or posh bits, 7 kilos is posh carbon frames and nicer bits, 6 kilos is not allowed in racing.

    Premier Icon continuity
    Free Member

    Dunno where all of your bikes’ pies are coming from – my aeroad, with 60mm clinchers, one-piece bar/stem and a mix of DA, eTap and a power meter is ~ 6.9kg with pedals, two bottle cages and a wahoo mount.

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Full Member

    Dunno where all of your bikes’ pies are coming from – my aeroad, with 60mm clinchers, one-piece bar/stem and a mix of DA, eTap and a power meter is ~ 6.9kg with pedals, two bottle cages and a wahoo mount

    Interesting. Every review of the Aeroad, including the Canyon website, appears to gave a basic weight of over 7kg.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    Anything under 8 kilos is a decent weight and you’ll struggle to notice much difference over any ridden circuit. your bodyweight will fluctuate by about this much from ride to ride. As will the volume in your water bottles.

    10 kilos is heavy, even with disks, 9 kilos is disk territory, 8 kilos is rim brakes and/or posh bits, 7 kilos is posh carbon frames and nicer bits, 6 kilos is not allowed in racing.

    Think this might have been argued somewhere in the thread already, but why would the difference between 6kg and 8kg feel less significant than 8kg and 10kg? The former is proportionally a lot greater after all.

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    If you add on the mass of the rider, the difference is very modest indeed; 80/78 compared with 78/76. It’s all psychology. More likely it’s the perception as one throws the bike around standing on the pedals in a climb.

    Premier Icon kerley
    Free Member

    Yes it is mostly perception and the fact the bike just feels lighter. Do people really think they would feel faster if they went from 70kg to 69kg?
    There are clearly limits though as a 15kg road bike would feel crap.

    Premier Icon finbar
    Free Member

    I’m not so sure. In running (as a more direct example without aero/stiffness etc. confusing matters), I find 2-3kg can make the difference between me feeling **** and me getting on the podium in races. And wearing a backpack that isn’t very heavy – a few kgs at most – slows me down massively.

    So I think, given we’re each so finely calibrated to moving our own exact mass around, that relatively small differences in equipment weight can actually be significant.

    Premier Icon Daffy
    Full Member

    Looking at it another way. Dropping from 70-68kg is like dropping 2.5% of your weight and even if you did, it would be gradual so you’d never feel the difference, but try running or cycling with 20-25kg (25% of your weight) load on your back for 2 weeks and then get rid of it. You’d instantly feel the difference. Similarly, my commuter and my roadbike are both gravel bikes and after riding the commuter, with lights, racks, tools, etc for a week and then getting on my roadbike, it instantly feels faster to accelerate despite only having 1kg between them at dry weight and possibly 2-2.5kg with all the bits.

    the 2kg extra doesn’t really limit you, but it also doesn’t encourage you like a light feeling bike does. It’s just somehow more fun.

    Premier Icon kerley
    Free Member

    So I think, given we’re each so finely calibrated to moving our own exact mass around, that relatively small differences in equipment weight can actually be significant.

    We are talking about sitting on a bike and pushing the pedals around, not jumping up and down. If 1kg makes a difference to you in overall speed over a few hours then so be it but I can’t say I can notice the 20 seconds difference spread over those hours.
    In fact some days I just feel faster than others and am sometimes surprised when I get home and upload my ride that I was actually slower than on some of the times where I felt slower.

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