Viewing 26 posts - 1 through 26 (of 26 total)
  • 45.503 lbs
  • Premier Icon howsyourdad1
    Full Member

    Thought this was amusing.  My enduro bike isn’t far off that weight I imagine

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/thought-experiment-whats-the-heaviest-trail-bike-we-could-build-for-10k.html

    Seems like a pretty nice bike TBH

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Full Member

    The tyres!
    Was my first thought, 3kg on already heavy rims, it’ll be a beast to get up to speed & change direction

    Premier Icon muggomagic
    Full Member

    DH tyres with inserts and tubes was funny.

    I like one of the comments that says you could spend the spare £3k in making it lighter 😀

    Premier Icon SirHC
    Full Member

    Privateer and Hunt got the heavy end of the shitty stick !!!

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Full Member

    And that was the claimed weight of all the kit, so add another couple of pounds for actual weight. As I said in the comments, I fully expect a similar build to be on Vital with a ‘weight’ of 32lbs.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    SirHC
    Full Member

    Privateer and Hunt got the heavy end of the shitty stick !!!

    The wheels didn’t really, they used a set of wheels that nobody would ever expect to the light (ebike and enduro specific). Their frames are also well known for being chunky too, just like Brian Park’s RAAW that was getting a bit of a laugh in the comments

    Premier Icon bedmaker
    Full Member

    Makes me wonder what my bike actually weighs….
    Starling murmur with Push coil, Onyx hubs/DT EX511, Hope brakes, Fox36, Cushcore, DD tyres…

    The Push and Onyx rear alone add a chunk of weight, but I would be loathe to get rid of either, they just ride so nice!

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Full Member

    Someone made an interesting (to me) point, that as regular bikes are getting heavier for a given application, at significant cost, why wouldn’t you just add a motor and battery? There a a number of trail ebikes that are a good chunk less than 45lbs now, so the ‘less manoeuvreable on the downs’ argument disappears, and the weight is better distributed than it might be on a regular bike, in the DT and BB area, rather than the wheels etc

    I say this as someone about to sell his ebike as he prefers his lighter regular bikes.

    Premier Icon mos
    Full Member

    Pretty sure a Rocketmax would have been heavier.

    Premier Icon kelvin
    Full Member

    What’s the Heaviest Trail Bike We Could Build for $10k?

    It’s not a trail bike though, is it? Fitting downhill tyres and Ebike wheels is the give away. You could make a heavy expensive “road” bike by fitting 29er downhill wheels and a huge all steel Ebike cassette.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    It’s not a trail bike though, is it?

    No, and I don’t believe trail was mentioned in the article. It’s just a bit of fun

    mos
    Full Member

    Pretty sure a Rocketmax would have been heavier.

    Privateer – 8.15lbs (Without shock, axle, etc.)
    RocketMAX – 8.5lbs (but no idea what that includes)

    So it might be

    Premier Icon kelvin
    Full Member

    No, and I don’t believe trail was mentioned in the article.

    Believe what you want.

    We at Pinkbike are committed to fitness, and we are putting those beliefs into action by giving you an imaginary trail bike that weighs more than 45 pounds, or 20 kilograms for those across the pond or literally anywhere else.

    They go on to call it a “trail bike” a few more times in the article.

    Since this is the age of trail bikes with dual crown forks, we could use a Manitou Dorado pro, which adds almost exactly a pound (at 3093g) and can be lowered to 150mm, which would totally work on this bike.

    While not traditional on a trail bike, this is no ordinary trail bike, so Saint cranks seem appropriate.

    Premier Icon monkeyboyjc
    Full Member

    I’m sure it could be made heavier – steel frame etc.
    It seems a less realistic bike than the weight weenie one they did though just by the parts choices Vs type of bike Vs value for money.

    Premier Icon mashr
    Free Member

    kelvin
    Full Member
    Believe what you want.

    I retract my comment, but keep “It’s just a bit of fun”

    Premier Icon mjsmke
    Free Member

    That’s over double my trail full sus. Its also over a third of my weight. Wouldn’t pay 1k for that, let alone 10k

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Full Member

    That’s over double my trail full sus

    That’s a VERY light trail bike, what is it?

    let alone 10k

    Came to 6700 ish USD, so less than £5k.

    Premier Icon SirHC
    Full Member

    Someone made an interesting (to me) point, that as regular bikes are getting heavier for a given application, at significant cost, why wouldn’t you just add a motor and battery? There a a number of trail ebikes that are a good chunk less than 45lbs now, so the ‘less manoeuvreable on the downs’ argument disappears, and the weight is better distributed than it might be on a regular bike, in the DT and BB area, rather than the wheels etc

    Building a 30lb enduro bike nowdays is a tough order, if you keep to sensible tyres and wheels, even a 30lb trail bike, your are spending some serious cash.

    Latest slash frame is 0.5kg heavier than its predecessor, new spesh enduro is similar weight gain.

    More gears, more weight
    More travel, more weight
    More seatpost drop, more weight
    Bigger wheels, more weight.

    The main issue with the trail emtbs is the spec is a bit lightweight and the geometry is bobbins. Spesh stumpy evo with the levo sl motor, sign me up (along with a load of range extenders, or a swppable battery)

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Full Member

    There a a number of trail ebikes that are a good chunk less than 45lbs now, so the ‘less manoeuvreable on the downs’ argument disappears

    That argument is bobbins though. A similar build with a motor would still be +15lb. You could have a 45lb e-bike, but it would have to be built like a 30lb bike.

    Latest slash frame is 0.5kg heavier than its predecessor, new spesh enduro is similar weight gain.

    Is it a fair comparison though? The Enduro now has more in common with the original big-hit than the original enduro.

    Even going back not quite so far, it’s closest to the Demo7, 2 travel rungs above the then Enduro.

    Premier Icon mjsmke
    Free Member

    That’s a VERY light trail bike, what is it?

    I’m miss calculating kg into pounds but it’s close. 2015 T130. Size small with short dropper, lighter wheels, lighter tires, tubless. 12kg. 26.4 lb.

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Full Member

    That argument is bobbins though. A similar build with a motor would still be +15lb. You could have a 45lb e-bike, but it would have to be built like a 30lb bike.

    My point was more ‘if you are going to have a 40+ lb, total, trail bike (some people say they don’t mind that) why wouldn’t you get one with lighter parts and an engine?’. As if it’s a trail bike, it’s not going to be taking massive hits or anything so durability shouldn’t be that big an issue. If people are using them as mini enduro bikes, fair enough, but for that weight, why not get a bigger travel option?.

    The above build is around £5k, a levo SL comp is £5,500 and 41lbs, so if you are used to a 30lb trail bike, it might not appeal, but if you’ve been lugging something like the above about, the appeal of a motor must be compelling.

    Then, if heavier bikes are becoming the norm, what’s the incentive to get a non assisted one?

    Premier Icon honourablegeorge
    Full Member

    mos

    Pretty sure a Rocketmax would have

    One of the mags had a recent bike group test, the Rocket was the lightest bike pf all the ones tested.

    Premier Icon chiefgrooveguru
    Free Member

    “ Pretty sure a Rocketmax would have been heavier.”

    I doubt it.

    From MBUK / Bike Radar about a week ago:

    “the overall weight of the RocketMAX at just 15.12kg, which was actually the lightest of all the bikes in the Enduro Bike of the Year test.”

    The Privateer frames are hefty. They have long wheelbases and are stiff and strong enough for gnarly riding but are made of aluminium alloy and use very little custom forged/machined parts to keep the cost down.

    Premier Icon Superficial
    Free Member

    Yeah, the Rocket I’ve just built up is 30.6 lbs on my scales. They’re not particularly heavy.

    Premier Icon peaslaker
    Free Member

    Isn’t it fascinating that hunting out premium “strong” components ends up being so much cheaper than light premium counterparts. It isn’t so much about “strong, light, cheap: pick two”. Apparently light is inversely correlated with cheap, just as it is inversely correlated to strong. Choose “light” and they take your money and sell you flimsy tat.

    Premier Icon stwhannah
    Full Member

    https://www.vitalmtb.com/community/Fahzure,9811/setup,42870

    That’s my partner’s ‘trail’ bike. DH tyres and inserts, because otherwise he’d destroy the tyres and wheels. He’s got a Geometron G1 as a DH bike, I can assure you this is the one he rides when he’s pedalling! He does have a Privateer 141 on order, which is apparently going to be his Calder Valley hill friendly build. It’ll probably still have DH tyres! Maybe he should learn to ride with finesse?

    Premier Icon SirHC
    Full Member

    The Privateer frames are hefty. They have long wheelbases and are stiff and strong enough for gnarly riding but are made of aluminium alloy and use very little custom forged/machined parts to keep the cost down.

    The back end on mine was pretty flimsy! Coming off a carbon enduro, G1 I have now is somewhere in between.

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