• This topic has 46 replies, 26 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by eskay.
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  • 17 year old and car insurance- how much?
  • Premier Icon codybrennan
    Free Member

    Its that part of my life when I get to have to worry myself to death over cars, driving, insurance etc for my eldest, who turns 17 later this month. I was maybe going to see if I can pick her up a cheap runabout to get the wheels turning.

    But can car insurance for a new driver for a car worth £1500 really be between £1000 and £1300??!???!

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Full Member

    we’re back to the Young Ones quote thread:

    third party !

    Premier Icon codybrennan
    Free Member

    Yeah. Its going to be 3rd party, most definitely.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Value of car has nothing to do with it. It’s he value of what they hit(high) Vs the potential risk (high)

    If it was a HSE risk matrix it would be a * do not do this task*

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    The cost of the car you’re driving is irrelevant it’s a tiny fraction of anyone’s  premium – what does it matter what his car costs if he runs into the back of a Ferrari?  Or hits a bus queue? The costs of death and injury make replacing and repair cars pretty trivial

    you’re  not going to see a big saving on a 3rd party policy

    Premier Icon jambourgie
    Free Member

    Doesn’t sound too bad to me tbh. Min’e not a million miles off that and I’ve not been 17 for a long long time…

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    Min’e not a million miles off that and I’ve not been 17 for a long long time…

    what have you been doing wrong?

    mines more that a £1000 less than that!

    🙂

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Full Member

    Yeah. Its going to be 3rd party, most definitely.

    Ah, sorry – I meant that’s why it’s expensive

    Premier Icon reluctantjumper
    Full Member

    3rd party might be cheaper now but over a few years the effect of a no claims bonus (if they don’t hit anything) means it’s cheaper long-term to go fully comp.

    Plus £1200 is not much more than I paid for car insurance as an 18 year old back in 1999 so it’s not unreasonable to my ears!

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    If my insurance was still 1000 I wouldn’t own a car . It’s silly money

    But a necessary evil to get started

    It drops rapidly provided you don’t qcrash.

    From about 22 I have been sub 500 on interesting stuff (quotes on a WRX Impreza were 450)

    On the stuff I end up buying 150-300quid ….that price hasn’t changed for about 10 years

    Reluctant jumper that makes no sense you still get NCB for third party . I think your confused with fronting which is illigal because it’s fraud

    Premier Icon nuke
    Full Member

    To break ourselves in gently to teenage car insurance, we;ve been just getting Veygo insurance for our learning-to-drive son on our 13 year old petrol run around (which he’ll eventually get)….been circa £130 for  3 months. Once he’s passed Im expecting the £1000+++ insurance

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    As you’ve discovered, the cost of insurance can easily outweigh the cost if the car. Unfashionable models will be cheaper to insure. Avoid things the boy racers buy. That doesn’t necessarily mean it has to be small and sluggish either.. My daughters first year was with a Tracker. That worked for her but check for curfews and whether your daughter uses any roads that have a high accident rate as those my introduce unsustainable restrictions.

    Premier Icon butcher
    Full Member

    What’s the car? That’s potentially going to make a big difference.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    I was paying around that 30 years ago as my postcode was NE and at the time an NE area was the joyriding capital meant I paid through the nose.

    My eldest is 17 and we’ve the joy of her insurance coming up once we can get her lessons again

    3rd party might be cheaper now but over a few years the effect of a no claims bonus

    No claims is no claims nothing to do with the insurance type.

    Premier Icon Wally
    Full Member

    Sounds quite cheap to me. Students I teach quote 2K regularly. Found out why expensive at Christmas when four 17 year olds flipped their car outside my house. Chasing another car down my narrow terraced road 1.30am, totalled their car (everyone got out of sun roof) and smashed up 4 parked cars. Police, ambulance, tow trucks, road damaged and recreational drugs left at scene. All taxed, insured and all students were OK. We were all 17 once.

    Black box an option?

    Premier Icon krixmeister
    Full Member

    Slight thread hijack – like @nuke I use Veygo for learner driver insurance for our learner. Rather than getting full insurance once she passes, have been thinking about just adding her occasionally a la Veygo.

    Is there an app or similar where you can simply buy add-on insurance for the day/weekend/etc?

    Premier Icon butcher
    Full Member

    It does sound quite reasonable to be honest. Factoring in inflation it’s well below anything I was quoted at 17. Especially if it’s fully-comp, that’s a straight no for anyone in their teens. It’s just the way it is and always has been.

    Premier Icon lunge
    Full Member

    That really doesn’t sound too bad I’m afraid.
    Also, don’t rule out fully comp, it may not be as much extra as you’d think.

    Premier Icon sam_underhill
    Full Member

    Don’t rule out a fully comp policy. If I cast my mind back a long way, I’m sure I had insurance that was cheaper as fully comp. Something along the lines of you are likely to present less risk if you are actually caring about insuring yourself as well.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    Facing that this next month, and expecting £1500.

    Having worked in motor claims in the past and seen way too many pics of the damage young drivers cause to their passengers, I know exactly why it’s the price it is.

    Premier Icon winston
    Free Member

    How many 17 year olds actually need to drive these days?

    Just because she is old enough to drive doesn’t mean she has to!

    One more car on the road is not really what we need right now.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    Presumably doing Veygo means they won’t accrue any no claims so will still have to take the hit at some point?

    Premier Icon cvilla
    Free Member

    Worth checking sites/firms that do daily rates and even cheaper when you determine what times (i.e. not evening or at night), so not cheap if you / daughter drive every day but worth looking at while learning.

    Premier Icon butcher
    Full Member

    One more car on the road is not really what we need right now.

    There is this too, which I think is always worth putting some thought into. Put her on your insurance and let her take your car every once in a while. Buy her a bike with the change.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Full Member

    Our 17 yr old son was due to sit his test around now, obviously pushed back due lockdown, and we’ve got a 66 plate Ka+ that we inherited from my late FIL in December that we have hung onto for him. Currently he’s a named learner driver and the car is in my wife’s name, and on an Admiral fleet family policy that’s in my name. As a learner it costs us about £200 extra per annum, however once he passes his test it will be an additional £1800 or thereabouts…

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    One more car on the road is not really what we need right now.

    You can learn to drive without owning a car.

    Premier Icon stumpyjon
    Full Member

    I don’t quite get teens getting a car when they pass their test, I passed at 17 but didn’t get a car until I was 21 and working, I didn’t need one whilst at university and could borrow my parents cheap metro when needed (but not the Volvo).

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Not everyone has the advantage of good local transport links and a job/education within easy walking or cycling distance.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Learning to drive when your young makes later life easier.

    Sil didn’t learn as a teen and is now trying to learn along side her job fighting for the evening lessons that everyone wants.

    Then work send her away on an assignment somewhere else and she lets the driving lessons slip……

    Back to square 1.

    Much easier as a teen to get the ticket.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    I don’t quite get teens getting a car when they pass their test, I passed at 17 but didn’t get a car until I was 21 and working, I didn’t need one whilst at university and could borrow my parents cheap metro when needed (but not the Volvo).

    My daughter is 17 and working as well as in education she can’t borrow our car as the insurance won’t cover her. Not everyone has the same circumstances.

    Premier Icon winston
    Free Member

    @scotroutes That is a common argument trotted out and for a tiny tiny segment of the UK population it might be true. For most it’s a justification to do something they would rather do over any alternative. That’s fine but people need to be honest with themselves and realise they are part of the reason our country looks like it does. I totally put myself in this bracket as we are a 2 car household.

    Premier Icon codybrennan
    Free Member

    Thanks all, good advice as per. Does she need a car right now? Probably not. Point above was well made and definitely something I’m thinking.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    I didn’t get a car until my final year at uni, despite passing at 17.
    I refuse to have a black box, having heard a few nightmare stories and it being a shared car.

    Ours on 1.4 Ibiza estate, with Mrs_oab and myself on full business insurance, 12k miles, full NCB are:
    No kids on @£180
    One on Provisional @£600 p/a
    One just passed @£1100
    One a year in, one provisional @£800
    Quote for one a year in and one just passed @£1600.
    I’ve a third one in a couple of years.

    Think of the bikes I could buy…

    Premier Icon codybrennan
    Free Member

    ‘Think of the bikes I could buy…’

    I feel your pain :/

    Premier Icon Dickyboy
    Full Member

    You can learn to drive without owning a car.

    Youngest son passed just before his 18th and hasn’t actually driven since – he turns 26 next month, but I can put him on Co car insurance because he’s held his licence for so long, he’s talking about a refresher course when restrictions are eased.

    Insurance for teens is expensive because they are more likely to be involved in a crash with multiple passengers that live with life changing injuries than other driver groups ☹️

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    more likely to be involved in a crash with multiple passengers that live with life changing injuries than other driver groups

    There’s a statistic I saw on an insurers site once.
    17 years old, double likelihood of crash.
    At night, double that again.
    Add passenger, double again.
    Add second passenger, double again…

    Etc.

    Premier Icon eskay
    Full Member

    My eldest (19) is paying £800 now for his second year (was £1100). He is driving a 2004 1.2 Corsa

    My youngest is learning and I bought a 2002 Fiesta 1.4 off of someone from work for £400 and the quotes are coming in at £1200

    Eldest is with Admiral with no black box. We are paying about £22 a month for learner insurance at the moment for younger son.

    He has a part time job that pays around £350 per month, so he will pay us monthly for the insurance for the first year.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Full Member

    There is this too, which I think is always worth putting some thought into. Put her on your insurance and let her take your car every once in a while. Buy her a bike with the change.

    Both our cars are automatic due to wife’s disability. Jnr needs to learn to drive a manual. We need to get a manual car 🤷‍♂️

    Whether he needs to keep it once he’s passed is maybe another matter, but no car = no car insurance = no No Claims Bonus being earned.

    Premier Icon tthew
    Full Member

    Put her on your insurance and let her take your car every once in a while.

    We tried that a couple of years ago. It was considerably more expensive than having the new driver as the policy holder with me and the missis as named drivers.

    That’s a point actually, is that quote with you and your wife as named drivers @codybrennan? That makes it cheaper.

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    Adding to your insurance for learning? Trivial amounts. Letting them drive off on their own when they’ve passed? Bend over.

    For my Twingo RS the cost for my son was originally £2700 as a NAMED driver on my policy (was £309 for me alone). We now have a combined dual car policy and it’s £400 extra for both sons (youngest is now 19 but he’s been driving it since 17 when I taught him).

    Third party insurance on a 125 Yamaha was £1250 when he was 18.

    Having a pilots license did kit make it cheaper despite showing maturity!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 47 total)

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