10mm rear axles

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  • 10mm rear axles
  • Yes and maybe.

    If an option from new, you might as well, but the jury is out as to whether it’s noticeably stiffer.

    I converted my Pro 2 on my Enduro and for the cash it cost me, I wouldn’t bother again.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    I preffered the Bolt-Up option.
    It just looked neater.

    I cant say 10mm rear QR axle felt any stiffer than regular QR, but the Bolt-Up one did.

    al1982
    Member

    hi, thinking of getting a new set of hope pro 2 wheels. currently run standard qr, i presume 10mm qr axles are ok and fully compatible with standard drop outs?

    also are they worthwhile?

    thanks

    sugdenr
    Member

    I converted pro2s and DT240, for the cost (2 bike, less than £30 all in with 2nd hand parts/diy and inc. DT RWS bolt thrus) I would always do it, with all the strength and stiffness in the rest of the bikes then just having a 100mm+ long 5mm thick rod of steel or titanium clamping axles together seems compeletely daft.
    If 5mm is OK on the rear WTF do you need 15mm or 20mm on the front for?

    If 5mm is OK on the rear WTF do you need 15mm or 20mm on the front for?

    Because the front is 2 long legs subject to pretty much every kind of deflection imaginable, the rear is made up of two triangles, so really the only deflection is side to side.

    scruff
    Member

    I always run them on my normal bikes now, I switched axles on an old steel HT and could tell the difference straight away.

    Completely different axle & frame structures, comparing front with rear. As TINAS says, only side-side deflection is worth caring about at the back. Front has to cope with more, so the complete wrap-around clamp in a full on 20mm provides more stiffness than a QR.

    At the rear, the QR is just clamping the frame to the hub, the hub invariable already a nice big hollow tube and some nice big flat surfaces for the frame to be clamped on to. If the QR can keep it nice and tight, you’re golden.

    So the key point at the back is to ensure the QR doesn’t stretch. A girt big 10mm bolt thru will allow practically no stretch = best. A standard 5mm rod will be (relatively) easier to stretch, but in reality its the QR mechanism itself that will allow the most “stretch”, with crapola plastic QR external cams being the worst, and a metal cam better.

    5mm all metal QR = better than a 10mm plasticky QR.
    bolt up = better than QR

    DT RWS are a pretty good (if pricey) answer, as they’re basically a bolt up with a nice handle.

    sugdenr – Member

    If 5mm is OK on the rear WTF do you need 15mm or 20mm on the front for?

    Less about keeping the wheel on and more about giving the fork a rigid structure.

    Premier Icon kimbers
    Subscriber

    10mm qrs for me on the rear, noticeable benefit on sketchy landings etc

    al1982
    Member

    thanks for the help guys

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Depends mostly on the frame tbh- like, I had a 10mm in one bike, noticable difference, changed frame to a much stiffer one, no noticable difference. So if you’ve got a flexy frame- and more importantly, if you care, because it’s not as simple as flex = bad… Then maybe it’s worth it.

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