100% horse meat, neigh it can't be true

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  • 100% horse meat, neigh it can't be true
  • enfht
    Member

    Ask yourself this, where did all the trillions of horses go to that have been replaced by motor vehicles?

    Cant believe we’ve been so naive for all these years, stinks of one enormous horsey cover up.

    BenjiM
    Member

    The biggest issue here isn’t that’s it’s horse meat, it’s that no one knew it was horse meat from the start. If they can’t even get traceability for the primary ingredient right, then their whole HACCP and QMS falls down. It begs the question what else do they have that is untraceable. Meat products have strict regulations for traceability. Thank god I work in the cheese industry and not in the meat industry. That said we’ve got the New Zealand “Milk Crisis” looming. That’s not too big of a deal though.

    konabunny
    Member

    I do but at the same time this is just the consumers complete lack of care or interest in what they eat coming home to roost.

    It’s like the pork in halal food story, an Irish Halal pastry company making faux halal sausage rolls from frozen blocks of meat imported from Poland to sell to prisons, you couldn’t make that up.
    Well, tbf the consumers in that case didn’t have much choice…

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    The biggest issue here isn’t that’s it’s horse meat, it’s that no one knew it was horse meat from the start.

    this.

    and is the UK the only country affected – surely factory in France is sellign their stuff all over Europe?

    and is there no investigation/legal action beign taken in Poland against the original supplier?

    zokes
    Member

    What exactly was you doing in your neighbours wheelie bin?

    *woosh*

    If they can’t even get traceability for the primary ingredient right, then their whole HACCP and QMS falls down.

    +1

    that was supposed to be the whole point of all the regulations (and expense) brought in after BSE – ear tags, passports, etc.

    Bloody cheeky of the dirty French as well, after all the fuss they made over British beef!

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Cows? Horses? Llamas? Zebras? They’re all just big daft four legged things that live in fields, that also have the added bonus of being edible. What’s the problem?

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    That said we’ve got the New Zealand “Milk Crisis” looming. That’s not too big of a deal though.

    You can’t just go dropping a comment like that in. Tell me more. I’m intrigued now.

    Muke
    Member

    You can keep your Findus lasagne I prefer…

    My Lidl Pony 😀

    ocrider
    Member

    Spin fail of the week

    A spokesman from Burson Marsteller, the damage limitation PR experts employed by Findus, said that the beef in the Findus beef lasagne had been found in tests to be on average 60% horsemeat, but added that beef only accounted for 15% of the product anyway.

    So that makes it alright then….

    When talking about this earlier on 5Live, a foodie expert lady (quality or health, can’t remember) was quick to point out how horsemeat mince would visually differ to cheap beef mince, being darker and far, far leaner.

    I was waiting for them to quip about eating healthier for less, but it never happened.
    Gave me some recipe ideas though 😉

    boxfish
    Member

    It’s easy to disguise horsemeat in burgers, just add some mascarpone…

    kjcc25
    Member

    What worries me is not that it is horse meat but that we don’t know what part of the horse. The product has probably been processed to such an extent that it could be any part not just what we would call meat. The best way to be sure of what you’re eating is buy from a local butcher so you see what you’re getting.

    shuhockey
    Member

    Just read with on the FT website (and I thought they were clever!)

    “Food companies will be ordered to test their beef products after it was found that some of the meat in Findus beef lasagnes may have been 100 per cent horsemeat.”

    ???? How does this make sense????
    I’m right 50% of the time, every time.

    seba560
    Member

    ???? How does this make sense????

    Only to the McDonalds marketing team.

    b r
    Member

    Also there aren’t the same regulations on what drugs you can give horses (and what you need to record) as there are cows/pigs/sheep etc. And based upon the stuff my wife was giving her horse last year when he was ill… 😳

    Kevevs
    Member

    Mmn. Llama burger.

    Despite all the recent news, Tesco have said their burger sales have remained Stable. They did, however, ask if I wanted anything on it. I said “yes please, a fiver each way”.

    Have to love a bit of horse canter….I mean banter.

    Ok, enough horsing around, back to work everybody.

    konabunny
    Member

    it was found that some of the meat in Findus beef lasagnes may have been 100 per cent horsemeat.”

    Maybe it varies by batch.

    It’s more about the drugs used by vets on horses – they are now testing for high levels of teshorseterone…

    Nicked from the Radio this morning.

    they are now testing for high levels of teshorseterone…

    Ouch. That one hurt. Even more than mine.

    Premier Icon richmtb
    Subscriber

    If Findus just label their products Beef flavour then the problem is solved

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Despite all the recent news, Tesco have said their burger sales have remained Stable.

    Genuine LOL there! 😆

    headfirst
    Member

    This has got me thinking, when I get home I’m going to look in my drinks cupboard and inspect my Captain Morgan’s for traces of Red Rum.

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    They’ve only found DNA, so it might not be horse meat. It might be horse semen.

    emac65
    Member

    You can keep your Findus lasagne I prefer…

    My Lidl Pony

    LOL !

    ericemel
    Member

    Next we will have an uproar about the contents of E120!!!

    Premier Icon Kona TC
    Subscriber

    The food industry exists to make a profit not look after our health that’s the Governments jobs; consumers/government’s have allowed a situation to occur where we will eat any processed food as long as it’s cheap. Sadly for many families cheap food is the only option available due to our continual race to the bottom of the wages table.

    Recent history is littered with examples where profit/greed by the big multinational food suppliers/producers forcing down the margins of our farmers added to/resulted in (depends on your point of view) salmonella in eggs, BSE, Turkey Twisters being feed to school children, faeces in burgers, etc, etc, etc all overseen by the likes of the Food Standards Agency (£1.2Bn of your hard earned taxes and 1700 staff employed to do?).

    In the drive to maximise profits we now import meat from anywhere that’s cheap, acknowledging/ignoring the fact that poor or non-existent enforcement of food production quality standards exist and behold we can now by processed meals containing meat other than those advertised on the packaging.

    The great and the good saying “I’m personally shocked that cheap processed food contains cheap unregulated meat products.” is in my view symptomatic of I am not to blame it was the system. (Staffordshire Hospital being the latest example of this)

    Will anything change? With the exception of food costing more, increasing profits for the perpetrators of this situation; sadly not be prepared for another false out cry when poor/contaminated products enter the food chain. 😥

    BenjiM
    Member

    For Binners:

    The basic gist of the NZ milk scandal centres around the use of, for the last 7 years or so, of an unauthorised fertiliser (DCD) , on the grass. Now Fonterra are the worlds largest dairy Co-Operative and the allegation is that they’ve found traces of DCD in milk used for some products, specifically milk powders, used in products such as infant formula (the chinese have kicked up a right stink about this due to the melamine incident a few years ago). Although we’re assured it’s safe the main issue is that the government AND Fonterra knew about this months ago, apparently. When did they let everyone know about this contamination? Why after they opened on the stock market!
    Cue furious anger from investors, customers et al over this blatant cover up. If the products are safe to consume as per Fonterra and the NZ government why did Fonterra feel the need to inform the NZ government of the contamination in the first place. The whole incident has basically lost Fonterra a lot of consumer confidence and trust What else aren’t they letting folk know. Here’s the response from Fonterra.

    DCD SUSPENSION
    Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited backs the move by Ravensdown and Ballance to voluntarily suspend sales and use of Dicyandiamide (DCD) treatment on farm land until further notice.

    The fertiliser companies announced the suspension today after very low levels of DCD were identified in some test samples of dairy products.

    “We have been assured by New Zealand’s regulatory authority – the Ministry of Primary Industries – that there is no food safety risk. However, DCD residues in agricultural products may present a future trade issue,” said Managing Director Co-operative Affairs Todd Muller.

    “Although DCD was a promising option for reducing nitrate leaching, it is critical that New Zealand’s trade reputation is preserved. The voluntary suspension is the responsible approach in the absence of any internationally agreed standards for DCD residues in food,” said Mr Muller.

    Fonterra will participate in a working group set up by the Ministry of Primary Industries to examine what the suspension means in terms of the future use of DCD in farming, including the impact on water quality requirements.

    BenjiM
    Member

    Next we will have an uproar about the contents of E120!!!

    Actually it may be on a list of banned substances as early as next year as will many Aluminium Lake food colourings. I’m part of the consultation on this. We use it in our Cheddar and Port cheese as a colouring as port doesn’t stain curd very well. It’s a shame as there are very few stable red colourings for food. Beetroot isn’t too bad however it’s no use for colouring cheese as over time it has a tendency of fading to brown. Not much cop if you’re maturing your cheese for a year or more.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Cheers Benji! Contaminated baby milk powder? That’s always going to be a winner with consumers!

    Kevevs
    Member

    Well, for my sins, i work on a checkout in a big supermarket sometimes. And it is surprising the amount of money people will spend on really bad food choices thinking it will go further/keep the kids happy/cost less

    squadra
    Member

    Don’t worry, a reliable source has told me that Findus lasagne is perfectly safe, I’m sure it’s true as I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.

    kevevs – maybe, but as long as there’s huge bottle of diet fizzy drink in there, then at least they’re taking a healthy option – right?

    a reliable source has told me that Findus lasagne is perfectly safe, I’m sure it’s true as I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.

    well really, talking lasagne, whatever next?

    brooess
    Member

    This is an education problem primarily. Do people not understand that for meat to be cheap, massive corners have to be cut?

    I don’t buy the ‘affordability’ rationale either – fresh veg, fruit, rice, beans etc etc are not relatively expensive but I think a lot of people lack the knowledge and confidence to cook basic foodstuffs and so they buy ‘cheap’ processed crap… And I’m including educated, middle classes in this.

    Simple rule. The closer the food is to it’s natural state (ie. the less-processed it is), the less damage it will do and the healthier it is. You can’t rip the nutrients out of a whole raw carrot…

    People are not forced to eat processed food, it’s 100% choice. The UK is currently making very poor choices (69% men overweight/obese, 59% women overweight/obese). If we choose price and convenience over our health then that’s our choice and manufacturers will provide for it…

    seba560
    Member

    Simple rule. The closer the food is to it’s natural state (ie. the less-processed it is), the less damage it will do and the healthier it is.

    The doctor who pumped my stomach after I’d eaten a bit of deadly nightshade might just want you to put a caveat in there somewhere. 🙁

    for meat to be cheap, massive corners have to be cut?

    So which part of a horse is the corner? 😯

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