why singlespeed

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  • why singlespeed
  • Premier Icon Moe
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    I’ve also found it’s improved my running speed! 😀

    chrispo
    Member

    Help! I didn’t have myself down as mathematically challenged but…

    1) Aren’t 32/16 and 34/17 exactly the same?

    2) My Alfine 8-speed is on 32/20, and I believe 5th gear is the 1:1 ratio, so roughly speaking 32/18 SS is equivalent to 6th gear and 32/16 SS to 7th, which seems insanely high to me. Are you SSers really that hairy-chested or is my maths wrong here?

    Premier Icon miketually
    Subscriber

    Aren’t 32/16 and 34/17 exactly the same?

    Yes.

    My Alfine 8-speed is on 32/20, and I believe 5th gear is the 1:1 ratio, so roughly speaking 32/18 SS is equivalent to 6th gear and 32/16 SS to 7th, which seems insanely high to me.

    Sheldon Brown’s calculator has the gear inches of your set-up down as

    1 – 20.6″
    2 – 25.2″
    3 – 29.3″
    4 – 33.3″
    5 – 39.2″
    6 – 47.9″
    7 – 55.6″
    8 – 63.2″

    32:16 on a 26″ wheel is 48.9″, so just a little bit harder than 6th gear.

    Are you SSers really that hairy-chested or is my maths wrong here?

    🙂

    Dancake
    Member

    I ran a simple Dual speed for a while. Bigger ring to commute to work and flat and a smaller ring for lazy offroad


    IMAG0098 by Dancake2010, on Flickr

    For the record, the Alfine Dérailleur type tensioner was the best I found for converted SS, even if it looses some of the elegance. The “push down”
    type tensioners were ok but if you were in between chain lengths (ie a little long), I would get the odd slip when really pushing

    satchm00
    Member

    I’ve actually taken a link out since taking that photo.

    It’s my ride to work it’s 34:16 I spin a little on one long flat but it get’s me comfortably up the hills and through the bridleways I tackle on way to work.

    I really enjoy it compared to my geared bike, I don’t get to work knackered (I have a habit of getting the hardest gear and going as fast as possible), easy to clean, fun to ride in fact different style of riding its also helped my fitness on ups and I now use my brakes less because I’m trying to not lose speed.

    It was also a fairly cheap build. Frame and forks off ebay the handle bar, stem and seat was bargains during January sales. Got a deal on brakes, wheels and cranks. I only spent £360, only luxury item was thomson seat post (factored in I’m 6ft 5 and 17 stone no point buying cheap seat post)

    Dancake
    Member

    Oh Go on then here’s another one from more affluent times


    Single Speed 456 by Dancake2010, on Flickr

    The 140mm fork and 2.5 minions probably didnt make sense but it was awfully good. You will hear it time and again but because you are keeping momentum up, you are forced into starting sections faster and getting air when you previously had not etc etc. Sounds like a cliche but true

    I dont run SS now of course – it was a fad

    Tried a 47″ gear at the weekend (32/20*29er) and it was a bit too spinny arround Dalby on the flat ish sections, nice on the hills though, I need to get out more so I can get back to 52″, which seems to spin out less (top speed = the speed youd stop pedaling and start pumping anyway).

    Tasso
    Member

    I’ll be sticking with the fad for a while yet.

    Invested heavilly in a Robin Mather custom frame with trackends several years ago now. It’s sprouted a big front wheel and lost the suspension forks but it’s still the quickest bike I have for climbing and most fun through tight twisty singletrack.

    Finished building up a Carver 96er yesterday with Midge flared bars running 34:17 and carbon rigids. Time for a SS comeback perhaps.

    White industries freewheels and 2:1 ratio the way to go unless you live somewhere very flat. It’s all about the climbing and the last thing you want is an unreliable hub/freewheel.

    tomlevell
    Member

    chrispo – Member

    Help! I didn’t have myself down as mathematically challenged but…

    1) Aren’t 32/16 and 34/17 exactly the same?

    Mathematically yes.
    In the eyes of the zealot No.

    32:16 on a 26″ wheel is 48.9″, so just a little bit harder than 6th gear.

    52″ gear Surly

    nick3216
    Member

    Mathematically yes.
    In the eyes of the zealot No.

    I’m sure track cyclists make a case for different chainring/cog sizes with the same ratio feeling different.

    Premier Icon miketually
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    52″ gear Surly

    You’re right; I must have got something wrong on the form. So, SSers are even more bad ass (and stupider) than I thought 🙂

    Premier Icon speaker2animals
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    I read somewhere that the chain is more efficient with bigger sprockets. Something to do with wrap around. Though I don’t think there is much problem in the 15 tooth and above, it’s more at your 11 tooth end.

    Premier Icon miketually
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    I read somewhere that the chain is more efficient with bigger sprockets. Something to do with wrap around. Though I don’t think there is much problem in the 15 tooth and above, it’s more at your 11 tooth end.

    Apparently, a 12t sprocket is faster than an 11t sprocket, for a given chainring size, for this very reason.

    With bigger cogs, you’re less likely to get chain slip and there should be less wear on the cogs?

    Premier Icon miketually
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    This bike‘s using a 27:10 drivetrain 🙂

    Premier Icon dday
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    The joy of every hill you get to, you geared mates will rush past you, and just as you approach the steep part of the climb, you will be in front, happily grunting away to the sounds behind of furious derailleurs getting mashed down to the respective granny rings as fast as those sweaty thumbs can press the levers. Glorious!

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Single speed is a job half done.

    Go fixed my friend and free your mind!

    Pah – fixed is a job half done – you still have a chain and two cogs.

    Premier Icon ononeorange
    Subscriber

    Went out on my 32:16 with a mate for a couple of hours yesterday morning, ride of the year so far. Thoroughly enjoyed it, reminded me (if I needed it) why I ride bikes.

    Shan’t bore you with stats (which are frankly pedestrian anyway), but it was great for me.

    Note though that the maintenance-free claims above are not toally true, as I found out when my transmission started slipping after several years use. A very stretched chain and virtually no teeth left on the rear sprocket seemed to be the cause.

    I did the Honc on mine yesterday- 50K , lots of hills, I loved it .Was going to do it geared and last minute change my mind and took the single speed – I find it so enjoyable as an alternative to my full susser .

    nick3216
    Member

    Wow, singlespeeds without ten days of kit on them are light!

Viewing 19 posts - 81 through 99 (of 99 total)

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