Unwanted neighborhood visitor (of the large variety)

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  • Unwanted neighborhood visitor (of the large variety)
  • deadlydarcy
    Member

    I bet that bear will be feeling a bit grizzly when it starts to wake up after the tranquilizer.

    pingu66
    Member

    Makes you glad you live in a town. πŸ˜€

    jackthedog
    Member

    I bet that bear will be feeling a bit grizzly when it starts to wake up after the tranquilizer.

    I’ll bear that in mind.

    Premier Icon huckleberryfatt
    Subscriber

    Wowβ€”gonna need a r-e-a-l-l-y big glass and envelope to trap that critter

    Pigface
    Member

    Don’t Panda to DD πŸ˜€

    fasthaggis
    Member

    Guys,you need to Paws and re-think some of those puns πŸ™‚

    samuri
    Member

    Is that in Scotland?

    officialtob
    Member

    You guys have stolen all my yolks πŸ™

    Oh wait… wrong thread.

    busydog
    Member

    Samuri–Albuquerque, New Mexico.
    Almost no food in the mountains this year, so they are coming into the city looking for something to eat. Last count they have caught and relocated about 25 and, unfortunately, had to put several repeat offenders down, including one that bit a guy on the hand after breaking into his house.

    legend
    Member

    samuri – Member
    Is that in Scotland?
    POSTED 8 MINUTES AGO # REPORT-POST

    I assumed it was Surrey

    wrecker
    Member

    This makes me sad. πŸ™

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Almost no food in the mountains this year, so they are coming into the city looking for something to eat.

    Could the residents not arrange to dump their leftovers somewhere in the mountains nearby, to prevent them coming into the city?

    busydog
    Member

    Mogrips–there is a push for to get the state Fish & Game people to do supplemental feeding (usually dogfood) up in the remote areas of the wilderness, but that has only met with some success in other states and there is quite an ongoing debate about it. One of the problems is people leaving their garbage receptacles outside of their garages and leaving dog/cat food outside. Also lot’s of fruit trees with ripe fruit now and that is a bear-magnet (and coyotes as well).

    Premier Icon mtbfix
    Subscriber

    Biggest baby robin EVER.

    Perhaps he was desperate and looking for the woods.

    The problem is they are vegetarians with restricted deitary needs only goes after cucumbear…

    IGMC

    Premier Icon honeybadgerx
    Subscriber

    bit a guy on the hand after breaking into his house

    If I came away from that close a bear encounter and only had to complain about being bitten on the hand I’d go buy a lottery ticket.

    busydog
    Member


    Exciting morning in the next door neighbors backyard. It took the Fish & Game guy 2 tranquilizer darts to knock him out. They just left to transport him out to one of the wilderness areas. Because of the drought, bear encounters here are almost a daily occurrence.

    Premier Icon mtbfix
    Subscriber

    That about sums it up.

    wrecker
    Member

    Lifer + 1

    busydog
    Member

    Lifer–you are right on target

    A lot of people here want to live adjacent to the mountains/wilderness, but don’t want the inconvenience of bears and all the rest of the wildlife that goes with it.

    Royston
    Member

    Was this in the garden of the Big Blue House?

    ell_tell
    Member

    Ahh poor guy.

    I love bears and wouldn’t like to meet one but always feel sorry when I see/hear about stories like this.

    I remember a similar tinge of sadness in Nairobi National Park which is now literally surrounded by the city.

    nicko74
    Member

    Perhaps he was desperate and looking for the woods.

    Nah, he would’ve been carrying his roll of Charmin if that was the case

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    The bear sure looks wursa for wear.

    pingu66
    Member

    How the **** does a bear break into a house, is it like “climbed through an open window” or jimmied it open. What if they are caught going equipped?

    In all seriousness it would be good if there was a way to at least partition the are, I know it would be a bloody big fence but hey as depicted above we are encroaching more into their environment than they are into ours. It saddens me to see such animals getting destroyed when more could be done.

    CountZero
    Member

    Lifer–you are right on target

    A lot of people here want to live adjacent to the mountains/wilderness, but don’t want the inconvenience of bears and all the rest of the wildlife that goes with it.
    Apart from the difference in the size of the wildlife, it’s exactly the same problem here in the UK. They want the picturesque qualities of living in the countryside, but will not accept the inconveniences that go with it, which locals think nothing of, like noisy animals, smells, mud, inconvenient rights of way, narrow roads, no local supermarket…
    Maybe if they had to watch out for bears raiding the house, and having to lock the waste bin to keep thieving ‘coons out, plus having the sneaky little bandits gnawing holes in the roof to make a nest, they’d be less worried about the occasional fox.

    busydog
    Member

    From what I heard, the guy who got bitten had a sliding glass door open, with only a screen door closed–the bear just pushed through it. the man was from Oklahoma and staying at the house for someone while they were out of town, so probably not very bear-savvy.

    The guy next door where this morning’s bear was caught, has 5 foot cinder block and wrought iron fencing in the front where the bear entered–it appeared he just jumped/pulled himself over it as there was bear fur clinging to the cinder blocks—it was apparently attracted by bird seed feeders and hummingbird feeders in the yard.

    It would be hard to erect any kind of barrier between the mountains and the city, due to the terrain, and it stretches for over 20 miles and parts of it would run through wilderness (no fencing, roads, etc.) and part through a major air force base.

    Fur folks sake!! Lifer has it spot on, you don’t have to be Kodiak to work that out… you would’ve thought there’d be a claws in the local byelaws for the community to bear responsibility. At least no-one came to a grizzly end, though there may have been some brown trousers from pooh. When I was a cuddly teddy boy who all the honeys drooled over, though I looked like a wild animal, everyone knew me as gentle Ben until I ate their faces off

    pingu66
    Member

    Wow 20 miles of rough terrain and they can’t do it? Wonder whether the moon landings are real if you can’t build a 20 mile barrier.

    The Australians managed 3500 miles in 1880, however I assume the advantage they must have had was it was mice and level.

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    I live in Pennsylvania, and the Game Commission usually uses a live trap to catch bears that are somewhere they are not supposed to be. They often use donuts as bait! πŸ˜€

    Sometimes, the bears leave their usual territory because food is scarce or something like that. Very often, it is the yearling bears that wind up in someone’s yard and have to be caught. Mom has told the year old cub to take a hike and that she will no longer tolerate it in her territory, so it is looking for a home of its own. Normally, they just catch the bear and release it in an rural wooded area. Bears that repeatedly return to populated areas (often attracted by garbage and/or people feeding them) have to be destroyed as they can’t be retrained.

    zokes
    Member

    The Australians managed 3500 miles in 1880, however I assume the advantage they must have had was it was mice and level.

    At one end, yes

    antigee
    Member

    I see those bears insist on having a full size spare wheel, does that make BMW designers not as smart as the average bear?

    Premier Icon JoeG
    Subscriber

    PA game warden letting one go

    What will happen when he gets home.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Apart from the difference in the size of the wildlife, it’s exactly the same problem here in the UK. They want the picturesque qualities of living in the countryside, but will not accept the inconveniences that go with it, which locals think nothing of, like noisy animals, smells, mud, inconvenient rights of way, narrow roads, no local supermarket…

    and then complain if you want to eat the wildlife!

    Wish I could reword the responses when you called up to report a bear in the garden.
    “Help! there is a bear in my garden”
    “best not go out there then”

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