Tarp/Bivvy Set-up

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  • Tarp/Bivvy Set-up
  • How big is the tarp?

    If you have access to a sewing machine, I cut my decathlon one down to a right angle triangle about 1/4* of it’s original size. Then a pole in the middle of a long edge and peg out the three corners, opening away from the wind, gives enough room for my head and shoulders on one side, and room to cook breakfast on the other side.

    Saves carting 4x more tarp than you really need, not so good for making a group shelter though.

    *obviously depends how big yours is to start with

    growinglad
    Member

    This works for me

    Premier Icon Clobber
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    Tarp is 250×170 cm but quite heavy!

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    tarp not for you then ton!

    Looks an unusual set-up growinglad, does the water run off of that ok?

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    Right, in light of the lovely weather we’ve been having…

    I done got me a bivi bag and a tarp, both ex-army goretex jobbies

    I would love to see some pics of your set-ups and get some advice on poles/beds/bags etc. if you’re willing to share the secrets of this mystic art…

    Premier Icon burko73
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    Catch the water then bath in it when you wake up?

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    That’s what I was wondering burko…! Maybe it’s just the photo…

    Any other input appreciated…

    Premier Icon AlexSimon
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    Some excellent info on the master thread, I’ve not managed to find anything on poles though… What poles do people pack in their bike bags?

    jamiep
    Member

    bearbonesbikepacking carbon poles are popular

    trail_rat
    Member

    i have a set of pole a bears from bearbones.

    up at fords of avon.

    the lad with tents fargo weighed 60lbs – my set up was 32lbs (albe it on a much lighter ragley td-1)

    for referance thats me under there at 6ft 2. with the pole a bear poles so with skillful pitching its possible to set a rig3.5 up to sit under it 😀

    Premier Icon AlexSimon
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    I haven’t tried it (hammocker), but I always like the ones that use the bike wheels instead of poles

    trail_rat
    Member

    Even with a 29er you end up with a very low tarp ime. It’s how I started but progressed onto poles after about 4th trip.

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    Any chance of a better photo of that set-up trail rat? email in profile if easier…

    I’ve had a look at the bearbones poles, how do you attach the tarp to them? just loop around the little nobble on the top? doesn’t look very secure?

    trail_rat
    Member

    while i might not want to be out in gale force winds with it – the tarps pretty darn secure on them poles. You take the line – attach it to the tie down point pull it out , wrap it round twice then pull it out taught to the floor and its this tension that holds everything in place.

    You have to pull tension into the lines to hold the tarp taught or its a noisy night.

    is that good enough ?

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    Yes, thanks for posting that up!

    rosscopeco
    Member

    Like most things, I guess it depends on how much you want to spend. Check out DrJons blog…he’s not afraid of the spendy outfits and has some really good advise.

    Me being more tight fisted…I ended up with an Alpkit Ordos 2 as up here in sunny Scotland…when it’s warm enough to camp out, the midges drive you insane. At just over 1lb (and lower if you ditch the bags and go with Ti pegs) and IMO it’s good value for money.

    Not the best photo, but it’s the only one I’ve got. That’s my down bag on top airing!

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/JoPiPq]Untitled[/url] by Rosscopeco, on Flickr

    thomthumb
    Member

    a good one

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/bBie8A]2012-04-22_07-32-45_469[/url] by <JamesD>, on Flickr

    a bad one

    [url=https://flic.kr/p/9PnT3w]P1020878[/url] by <JamesD>, on Flickr

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    At just over 1lb (and lower if you ditch the bags and go with Ti pegs) and IMO it’s good value for money.

    Looks nice but Alpkit say 1.3kg… still not bad though but I already have a tent

    growinglad
    Member

    Looks an unusual set-up growinglad, does the water run off of that ok?

    Yurp..there is a bit of para chord around the hood that you tie to a tree, means you don’t get any dips.

    By the time I’ve tossed and turned during the night my feet are probably hanging out the bottom, but my bivvy bag is water proof so nay worries.

    To be fair that particular set up was after a 150km ride with 3 mahoosive mountain passes in the scorching sun, followed by a 2 hour ride into a head wind to get to the camp site so I wasn’t at my best during erection!

    rosscopeco
    Member

    Ahh…typo…yes, it’s just over the 1kg mark not 1lb….that would be silly light! Still good though!

    trail_rat
    Member

    only issue with ordos is – tent is tent.

    “when it’s warm enough to camp out, the midges drive you insane”

    just means your doing it wrong and FWIW i dont believe in “midge repellant”

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    Hey TR, not calling you out on this, genuine question… what are your top tips for avoiding midges without the repellent, I can’t stand the stuff either…

    trail_rat
    Member

    Skins base layer , thin liner gloves , midge head net and socks.

    No exposed skin . Much more effective than midge spray which I find a placebo at best.

    Then when I go to bed I get into my sleeping bag and put the nozzle net over the hood.

    No issues with the midge for me.

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    Hmm more stuff to consider.. and what is a nozzle net?

    shindiggy
    Member

    Some great inspiration in this thread

    Bivvi

    trail_rat
    Member

    Nozzle is mozzie auto corrected oops.

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    Successful Night Bivvying last night…! Lovely and warm, but I think that was more due to the ambient temperature rather than the kit…

    Still, 100% dry and warm so thanks for all your input!

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    Just thinking… what do you guys if it is really chucking it down when you pack up? Do you try and get the stuff in to the bags whilst under the tarp and just have a wet bivi and tarp to keep separate? Not a lot of room for this and possibly a wet floor…

    I imagine if you get your stuff really wet and then have set-up the following night it must be grim?

    joshvegas
    Member

    Just pile the wet stuffinto a water proif bag.

    Then if the weather improves get it out and drying during lunch.

    Premier Icon benp1
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    Wet stuff goes together, dry stuff goes together, I don’t let the 2 meet in my bikepacking bags

    Usually means tarp and bivvy go in a separate place, or in another bag to protect it

    joshvegas
    Member

    I tend to have a mesh bag aswell so stuff can dry off (ish) whist its strapoed to something appropriate

Viewing 33 posts - 1 through 33 (of 33 total)

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