SPDs on a Road Bike?

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  • SPDs on a Road Bike?
  • atlaz
    Member

    WTF are hotspots?

    Basically it’s a pressure point where your cleats are attached to the shoe and the pedal pushes on them. Ends up with it feeling hot/painful if you ride long enough. I only got them with MTB shoes and eggbeaters (I’ve tried no other MTB shoe+pedal combo though) and never had them since I switched to road shoes.

    Premier Icon Haze
    Subscriber

    I used to use candies, they seemed to work fine at the time but the move onto proper road shoes/pedals was enlightening 🙂

    rudebwoy
    Member

    shimano sandals and spd type pedals seem fine to me–weeks of touring or long day rides…..

    persona
    Member

    Thanks M1kea and Atlas

    Never experienced any of the symptoms you describe despite using SPDs for 20+ years. On the road bike with carbon, plastic and mtb soles. haven’t used SPDs on an mtb for probably 15yrs but never experienced it when I did..

    Can’t really see how it’s caused by duration of the ride? badly fitting shoes, poor cleat set-up or poor pedalling technique sound more likely culprits, no?

    Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    get normal spds, road pedals would look daft

    Functionality and comfort beats looks any day imho.

    Normal SPDs on all my bikes (well, 1 CX and 2 HT), but I do notice a slight lack of support on the outside of the foot. Was going to try those newer type XT Trail SPDs which have a tiny bit of cage round them.
    Did consider a swap to CB eggbeaters (with cage) but that means a swap on all bikes in one go, since I use the same shoes for everything.

    IanW
    Member

    Up to 6 months ago I would have said SPD’s are fine for all bikes. However I bought some SPDsl’s and am now convinced of there improved function when on the bike at least. Tougher to clip in, out and less pleasant to walk on but much more connected when your peddling.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Thanks for all the replies – glad to see I’m not alone in my perversion. 😀
    Think I’m pretty sold on sticking with a MTB-style SPD system with recessed cleats that can be walked on.

    A lot of people mentioning Candies, but my experience of them is that (unlike the Mallets) they only contact the shoe at the cleat/eggbeater and the cage around them doesn’t offer any support.

    Has that improved in later designs? Or is it just a case of finding shoes that will touch the Candy cage when engaged?

    the move onto proper road shoes/pedals was enlightening

    Is it a night and day difference then? More comfortable or just faster?

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Think I’m pretty sold on sticking with a MTB-style SPD system with recessed cleats that can be walked on.

    For the sort of riding you mentioned in your OP that’s probably a good idea. For full-on road riding though, most of the non-recessed cleat systems have optional “cafe covers” that improve walkability a lot (though they won’t stop you hobbling entirely!)

    dantsw13
    Member

    A decent pair of mtb shoes will have stiff enough soles to avoid hotspots, and still have walk ability.

    My road bike has XTR trail SPD’s and my Northwave Celsius boots.

    brakes
    Member

    candies… they only contact the shoe at the cleat/eggbeater and the cage around them doesn’t offer any support.

    that was true of the old design, but the new design is notably different and there is definite contact with the cage. I still have both old and new types and much prefer the newer ones.
    it will also depend on the tread of your shoe.

    Rscott
    Member

    Graham S YGM.

    persona
    Member

    Is it a night and day difference then? More comfortable or just faster?

    No. Neither!
    it depends on how serious a racer you are.
    It’s a bit like wearing a barbour jacket and carrying a shotgun to walk your retriever in the woods ie. only really worthwhile if you are going to put them to their proper use.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    it depends on how serious a racer you are.

    On a scale of 1 to 10? Around 1.

    No real intention of racing any time soon. Might do the odd sportive in the future, but that’s about it.

    As I mentioned earlier, CX bike with 28mm tyres and discs (even mudguards and a bell!), it’s not exactly a race machine.

    I find single sided pedals a bit of a pain when in traffic, starting at temporary lights etc.

    Roadie ones always hang the same way, the right way up pointing about 45deg up at the front. Cliping in’s just a case of sliding your foot forewards to engage the nose of the cleat in the ‘loop’ of the pedal at TDC, then the action of pedaling (pushing down) clicks the back in.

    Has that improved in later designs? Or is it just a case of finding shoes that will touch the Candy cage when engaged?

    Well my shoes wore away at the body so there must be some suppourt at least on the sides.

    The bearings (the mid range cartrige model, so not even the cheep one!) only lasted 5 months (100 hours, 800 miles?) though so wouldn’t recomend them at all based on that.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Oooh that’s pretty sucky!

    I rebuilt the Mallets a couple of months ago after the bearings exploded and left me like this:

    But they were ages old and had just suffered through a winter of commuting through snow (and no maintenance).

    TiRed
    Member

    Look KEO for all road duties including commuting and riding fixed wheel. I carry cleat covers for walking in a back pocket and have shoes at work. Clipping in becomes second nature – even fixed – where there is much less room for error.

    I did start road riding many years ago on 747 spds, and ride spds on the tandem when I need to hold the bike up with a stoker – the extra shoe grip helps. Never had hot spots either.

    prawny
    Member

    I changed to SPD-SLs over the winter for my road bike, I’m thinking of changing back, I’ve been suffering with numb feet and I think it’s vibration causing it (the pedal connection is much more rigid) plus the fact that cleats cost a fortune and wear out in 10 minutes, I’ve not found any obvious benefit.

    Other than I can wear shiny silver shoes now.

    m1kea
    Member

    persona – Member

    Thanks M1kea and Atlas

    Never experienced any of the symptoms you describe despite using SPDs for 20+ years. On the road bike with carbon, plastic and mtb soles. haven’t used SPDs on an mtb for probably 15yrs but never experienced it when I did..

    Can’t really see how it’s caused by duration of the ride? badly fitting shoes, poor cleat set-up or poor pedalling technique sound more likely culprits, no?

    I have monkey feet (v broad and high insteps) so take shoe fit seriously. All my shoes have conformable moulded insoles and I currently have, Carnac, Northwave, Sidi and Spesh shoes.

    Two factors I am confident with: 1) MTBing involves a lot of stop start so you get to flex the feet more. 2) I only tend to get this problem when it’s hot.

    Back OT, road cleats do wear quite quickly if you do any walking on them. – Another factor to consider?

    Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    I find single sided pedals a bit of a pain when in traffic, starting at temporary lights etc.

    Roadie ones always hang the same way, the right way up pointing about 45deg up at the front.

    Single sided (normal) SPDs don’t though. Or at least mine don’t. They hang basically upside down, so you have to flip them over and engage, which when in traffic getting away from the lights usually means riding one foot clipped in, the other on the underside of the 1-sided SPD for a few turns to get across the junction, and then worry about clipping in.

Viewing 19 posts - 41 through 59 (of 59 total)

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