Road cycling benefits

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  • Road cycling benefits
  • TurnerGuy
    Member

    depends how you ride the bikes, don’t see why you can’t build up the quads on an XC mountain bike and avoid the traffic/fumes/vindictive drivers.

    Main difference for me seems to be how inviting a road bike is to get out of the saddle, such as for a climb, and I find climbing with a spinny cadence very good for my legs, and it benefits my running as I am a lot more ‘springy’.

    That’s the only reason I have one – pushing XC hard on a mountain bike is just as good imho for fitness, maybe better as it is more interval.

    Have you thought of a cross bike instead – I have a croix de fer as well just for hour long routes round the local forest at a decent pace, and it takes less slope to invoke an out of the saddle climb than on the road.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I looked at cross bikes but can’t find any at the same price as a Triban. I do enjoy the xc Mtb but sometimes I like a quiet road, plenty of them up here. And the Mtb is a chore on the road. And the roots, and vibration at the moment crease my knee.

    If you want to build up your quads you’re probably best off going to the gym and lifting some weights with the real hardmen. You’ll get more respect off your mates/laydeez/motorists, and it’s a much safer place to be.

    There are benefits to road cycling, although they can be hard to see at first. Alot of newcomers tend to go in at the deep end. Before they know it, they’re only interested in internet based bike rides, they’re wearing white oakleys (even when it’s overcast) and their head is just full of numbers like average speeds/calories burned/powers outputted etc. etc.

    If you can wade through all this nonsense (which is fairly easy since you’ll be doing it out of enjoyment rather than as a profession) then it’s usually good fun, even when it rains.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    For me, it’s something different. There are limited local mountain bike trails here so without driving (as we only have 1 car that the missus takes to work) I can ride something different.

    I can also ride for longer, more consistently with less brain power. It improves my general fitness and it’s also a good stress relief.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I’m quite lucky as Gisburn is half hour in the car, and Darwen moor and Rivington are all easy access. But sometimes when I just want a ride a bogfest is not appealing. So hoping the road cycling will keep me cycling and when conditions are favourable for the Mtb the extra fitness won’t make it such a chore.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    You’ll find that all top mountain bikers spend a considerable amount of the time riding road bikes – that applies not only to XC whippets, but also to those taking part in more gravity assisted disciplines. I’ve been waiting ages for an opportunity to name drop like this, but I’ve been out on road bikes with both Liam Killeen and Tracey Moseley.

    Sure you could develop your quads in a gym, but that would only be good for impressing the laydeez (those who are impressed by well developed quads) – unless you’re into track sprinting you’re far better off developing your muscles on a bike. If you’re actually interested in training, then one big advantage of road biking is that it starts at your door.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    As per my previos post about road bikes I’m gonna go for a BTWIN Trojan 3 hopefully the red one but if not the white one will do. I think my aims are to improve my general fitness and as something different to keep my mountain biking for fun as opposed to fitness. But also I’m due microfracture surgery soon to repair damaged articular cartilage in the next 5 weeks. Now once I’m recovered I’m told road cycling will be good for my knees to build up my quads. Will I see more benefits from road riding than mountain biking?

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I don’t want huge quads but my left one on injured knee side is wasting so want to build that up and to speed up my recovery once op is done. And obviously for fitness. And just being on a bike. I like to be out on a bike, off road, on road, pedal or engined. Just need the right machine for the discipline.

    bjj.andy.w
    Member

    I also started road biking to improve my fitness for mtbing and it has, in a big way. Not only for the climbs but also for the descents. Because I can recover from the climb so much quicker the downhill is easier and therefore faster. I also used to go to the gym and even doing the “big lifts” (squats & deads) I put on more muscle on my legs in six months road biking than I did in three years of going to the gym. If you only live 30mins away from Gisburn you must live near the Bowland fells, ( like I do ) it’s a fantastic area to ride a road bike 😀

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    Yeah never enjoyed the gym. Full of knobs in vest tops with their vanity muscles to impress the ladies in pompus bars. Not for me. I have muscles for strength that’s all I want. And to have stamina and my main aim to lower my blood pressure, diagnosed with moderate hypertension in 2008 160/117 average over a 24 hour period. So aiming to get my bp med dose lowered.

    And hmm I wish I lived in the bowland area but live in Darwen, not far to gis. 30 min drive.

    IanW
    Member

    Yes, It would be difficult to put the same sort of sustained effort in on a mtb that you can on a road bike. Particularly though something like quads. On a mtb you will be changing position to account for the trail surface whilst on a road you can generally focus on applying power to the pedals.

    I would suggest a route that’s convenient, time yourself and work on reducing it, stay seated and controlled and make the legs work.

    That said IME core strength exercises support knees as much as leg muscles, so you could mix a few of those in too.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Dunno about the posters above, but road biking has significantly improved my cardio, massively improved my climbing, oh and over threshold road intervals are one of the hardest exercises I’ve ever done but have given me quick gains and 1/2 stone weight loss in 3 months.

    This has translated to MTB as:

    a) I’m fitter for longer
    b) I can sustain a higher pace on climbs for longer (constant cadence)
    c) I’m no longer scared of lycra

    Shibboleth
    Member

    You’ll become more attractive to women, more successful in your chosen career and butterflies and baby birds will land on your outstretched finger, completely unprompted!

    camo16
    Member

    Dude, you don’t need an excuse to get yourself a roadie…

    MTB and roadies are like hot sisters. Both have something to offer, and can work in combination. 😉

    Also, you’ll realise someday that roadies are awesome.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I’ve always liked the idea of road riding and do like quiet country roads. I used to cycle for miles as a teenager on a old Mtb. Even though I have a hardtail it’s a slog on the road with the super tacky maxxis tyres.
    If I was to buy a Triban 3 or A sensa that I’ve seen in Merlin reduced from 450 to 350 could I put cx tyres on to do say gravel tracks or just stick to the tarmac.

    If I was to buy a Triban 3 or A sensa that I’ve seen in Merlin reduced from 450 to 350 could I put cx tyres on to do say gravel tracks or just stick to the tarmac.

    Not on a Triban: the biggest tyres you’ll get in there are 25c. Great bike though: I like mine a lot and I never thought I’d get into it so much.

    MTB and roadies are like hot sisters. Both have something to offer, and can work in combination.

    Are you from Millom?

    prawny
    Member

    I rode my old road bike on gravel tracks, you only need CX clearances for mud.

    I took a wrong turn once and rode it down a fire road on the chase for a mile or so, wasn’t a problem at all.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    The major benefit of a road bike is that you can go road cycling, which is fun. The extra fitness is a side benefit.

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    They sound like good benefits and is a alternative when I can’t afford a social ride on motorbike too. Plus an excuse for cake and a brew.

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    It’s ace. Sunny day, quiet country lanes, great feeling of speed (sadly missing on the trails until the recentish warm weather.) No dull riding or driving to the trails, just ride from your door. As has been said, get some guards, some decent overshoes and a jacket and it’s even fun when the weather’s not so good and the trails would be a mudbath.

    Benefits? For the same amount of time spent on the bike I reckon you’ll get fitter and faster on a road bike than you would riding your mtb.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I dunno why people keep saying you get fitter on a road bike. You lot must all be mincing about and chinwagging something awful on your MTBs.

    MTBing, near me at least, has very steep and loose climbs that you need to power up to keep moving. For me, this requires far greater effort over 1-5mins than anything on the road bike. Conversely, you can do much longer efforts on the road bike without interruption, so half an hour of being on the rivet.

    Both are probably good, but you can replicate the advantages of either form on the other, it just requires slightly more dedication.

    I use my road bike for targetted intervals becase it’s quick and there are a few suitable roads near me; for long base rides because there are fewer interruptions; and when it’s really wet. I use MTBing for properly burying myself because I just can’t get up the enthusiasm for that on the road; for enjoyment, cos it’s more fun; and when it’s windy, cos the trees shelter me from the wind.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    I dunno why people keep saying you get fitter on a road bike.

    The people you refer to include professional mtb racers. Still, what do they know eh?

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    The people you refer to include professional mtb racers. Still, what do they know eh?

    Read the rest of my post… I said both are useful.

    Still, what do I know, eh? 😉

    bwfc4eva868
    Member

    I think I want to try road cycling because I don’t want to get bored of the Mtb and Mtb so the road cycling doesn’t get boring. Wet weather doesn’t bother me. I do like night riding though. Anybody do night road cycling?

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    Read the rest of my post… I said both are useful.

    Still, what do I know, eh?

    My understanding is that professionals spend most of their training time on the road. That’s because they get fitter on a road bike.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    Anybody do night road cycling?

    I regularly do the Friday Night Ride to the Coast and did the Exmouth Exodus last Saturday.

    http://fnrttc.blogspot.co.uk/
    http://www.exmouthexodus.co.uk/

    prawny
    Member

    bwfc4eva868 – Member
    Anybody do night road cycling?

    Not really, too many nobs out at night, I go cycling in the morning before the sun comes up though all through the winter, it’s great you have the roads pretty much to yourself. Here’s a picture I took on new years day this year

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    My understanding is that professionals spend most of their training time on the road. That’s because they get fitter on a road bike

    That makes it sound like there’s something particularly special about road bikes that makes you fitter. But it’s not true. It helps you keep to certain training parametes, because there are fewer other factors, but it’s not intrinsic to road biking. The advantage for your average cyclist is probably co-incidental I reckon.

    Anyway, yes I have been night riding on road, a lot, and it can be awesome. In the winter, rush hour is a nightmare, but after that the roads get quiet, and after about 10pm in the country the roads can be deserted which is lovely. I once did a long ride somewhere Salisbury Plain ish, long open roads, no cars, moonlight countryside, it was fantastic. I also used to do 3 hour training rides after my wife had gone to bed at 10pm.. 🙂

    andypaul99
    Member

    [quoteMy understanding is that professionals spend most of their training time on the road. That’s because they get fitter on a road bike[/quote]

    Thats because road cycling is much easier on your body, to train for 25 hours a week off road would not give a MTB racer what they need, plus also for long constant power workouts its virtually impossible to do them off road because of the technical nature of most trails.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    There’s also far less cleaning and maintenance to do, if you are training a lot.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    That makes it sound like there’s something particularly special about road bikes that makes you fitter. But it’s not true. It helps you keep to certain training parametes,

    Well that’s the point, isn’t it? The training MTB racers need is based on certain parameters, and these are best served by a road bike.

    In other words, you get fitter on a road bike.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    In other words, you get fitter on a road bike.

    Only if the kind of training you need to be doing is more convenient for you to do on a road bike where you live.

    You may be able to USE a road bike to get faster or improve your endurance, different thing. It’s not necessarily the case that if Mr W. Warrior spuffs £3k on a Bianchi then he’ll suddenly start moving up the Strava results pages.

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    You’ll get even fitter on the turbo 🙂

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    When I did a lot if training I used a roadie more than my MTB as it was easier to stay in my training zones ( climbing especially) MTB is sometimes “too hard” ie if you want 2 hours in Zone2 then even a slight rise on an MTB would push me into Z3, whereas on a roadie you can generally just bang out the miles and hours.

    However I pretty much always did maximal and threshold on my MTB

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    The most useful thing you can learn on a turbo is how to endure severe mental torture. Ironman is as nothing after 2 hours on the turbo.

    thomthumb
    Member

    That makes it sound like there’s something particularly special about road bikes that makes you fitter. But it’s not true.

    it’s not the bike but the road that’s special, ie the surface. Being able to do maintain steady power outputs for sustained periods is much more difficult off road.

    the road bike is the right tool for road riding but the bike makes no difference to the training benefit.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Subscriber

    You may be able to USE a road bike to get faster or improve your endurance, different thing. It’s not necessarily the case that if Mr W. Warrior spuffs £3k on a Bianchi then he’ll suddenly start moving up the Strava results pages.

    It’s not a different thing. No-one is claiming that road bikes have some special property that will improve your fitness.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Yeah it’s different. Simply buying one isn’t enough (necessarily), you have to know how to use it. And if you know how to use it you could do the same on an MTB if you have the right trails.

    Anyway – the OP should get a road bike if he fancies it, but he still needs training knowledge if he wants to get quicker fast 🙂

    A few CAT 1 mates have been training on the road on their hardtails with super tacky maxxis downhill tyres fitted. Sounds daft, but there’s a bit of science behind it – training on a heavier bike with draggy tyres will mean they’ll be much fitter and faster when they jump back on their road bikes.

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