oddest ‘tool’?

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  • oddest ‘tool’?
  • soma_rich
    Member

    I regularly use the extension arm of my “non branded vacuum cleaner” as a persuader.

    Premier Icon Pook
    Subscriber

    rock and rock used as chain link extraction tool on recent ullswater loop

    Jimmer
    Member

    Crank extractor was stuck in the cranks arm thread, couldn’t get it out and need leverage so used the sterrer of the original 97 bombers to lever it, only problem being it lifted the bike so needed something to lever the other crank to stop it from moving too, this came in the shape of an azonic ds1’s headtube…. few beers were had too that night!

    Gary_M
    Member

    Use a football stud with my crank extractor to get my lh crank arm off. ‘pin’ on crank remover tool is too small and goes through the hole.

    joemarshall
    Member

    I just used a washing line (the metal base bit) to get leverage to undo a crank.

    Can anyone beat that for an odd thing they used as a tool?

    Joe

    Premier Icon chakaping
    Subscriber

    Secateurs make a good HT2 preload cap tool.

    Large log by the side of the trail was handy for refitting my XT HT2 cranks just before a race.

    J0N
    Member

    Drill bit as spacer when extracting ISIS type cranks using a sq. taper only type extractor.

    Jimmer
    Member

    It’s about time we went back to good old square taper crank and bb’s looking at all the above….

    Premier Icon Richie_B
    Subscriber

    soma_rich
    Don’t throw the rest of the vacuum away, the rigid tubes are ideal for fitting crown races

    16stonepig
    Member

    Penny to change a square taper crank extractor into an ISIS one…

    peachos
    Member

    used one of them wirey garden rakes to get more leverage on a 12mm hex to remove my freehub. worked a treat compared to the previous (failed) methods.

    sharki
    Member

    I’ve used a deodorant bottle as a………… oh one of them bikey tools *blushes*

    a tree?

    joemarshall
    Member

    It is amazing how much leverage you can get on an allen key with a big old piece of pipe on the end. Makes me worry more about overtightening than undertightening. Can you overtighten a crank bolt?

    Joe

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber

    Not bike related but my brother used gaffer tape & zip-ties to lash my electric hedge trimmer to his washing line prop. Made a pretty nifty extra-tall right angled hedge trimmer.
    All went well till he tripped & it went through the shed.

    markc123
    Member

    Can you overtighten a crank bolt?
    Yes.
    I did mine (SQ taper) with the torque wrech recently and was surprised as just how much torque was required however.

    alpin
    Member

    i want one of those tools for resteeting the hanger on a steel frame. anyone know what they’re called?

    used one before in the shop but, fancy making my own.

    i’ve just put together half a bike with homemade doowahs…

    samuri
    Member

    When you could still buy quality PC cases we would harvest the blanking plates from the IDE slots at the back. They made brilliant screwdrivers, levers and popping out tools for all sorts of IT related repair jobs.

    julianwilson
    Member

    top half of an axle stand (for a car, that is) is just the right internal diameter to use as a crown race installation ‘tool’ if your steerer isn’t too long, and you can really whack the bejeesus out of it. This was invaluable on my surly fork as the steerer is ‘stepped’ rather than tapered at the bottom.

    Also the reverse of this would be that my kids like to put the end of my track pump in their tummy buttons and pump, making entertaining little farty noises. Hours of fun!

    RudeBoy
    Member

    I once used two bits of flat rock, to pop a chain rivet back in. Miles from anywhere, in the Poldice valley, where there is an abundance of flat-sided rocks. Better than Terpischore’s example.

    i want one of those tools for resteeting the hanger on a steel frame. anyone know what they’re called?

    Bastard big adjustable spanner…

    mamadirt
    Member

    Rock? Why didn’t I think of that. I used my teeth to mend a broken chain . . . still have a slightly chipped front crown.

    Premier Icon markgraylish
    Subscriber

    I used a handy dry-stone wall to straighten a rear mech hanger on a mates steel bike…

    meehaja
    Member

    I put a square taper BB in with a teaspoon and a hammer.

    oldgit
    Member

    Axle stand used as per Julianwilson, last night in fact.

    hamishthecat
    Member

    I use the corner support pole of an early 1990s Ikea shelving unit which makes an excellent slide hammer for fitting crown races.

    bent_udder
    Member

    A safety line stanchion from a Royal Navy minesweeper is great for adding leverage to allen keys. You need to, er, acquire one first, though.

    Takeaway chopsticks were perfect for applying small amounts of grease in the right places on the insides of Rock Shox Judy forks.

    Fiberflight carbon spokes are also excellent for easing off grips you want to use again – they’re flat, thin and flexible, and the carbon doesn’t score bars.

    Boat lifts are great for moving the cars of inconsiderate d!ckheads who block the way in marinas:

    although it’s also just as easy to drag them away using a tractor, although that does leave the car with flat spots on the tyres, and usually a stretched tow eye (ooh).

    Joxster
    Member

    Old fork arm with some old chain makes a great chain whip. It just needs to have a mudguard eyelet.

    mudshark
    Member

    I once built an ikea chest of drawers with a spoon as friend asked me around to build it for her and I didn’t think to ask if she had a screwdriver.

    bent_udder
    Member

    Old non-drive-side crank is great for destressing wheel builds – but this was something Sheldon Brown wrote a lot on: Linky.

    MTB-Idle
    Member

    similar to OP, I use the top half of the kids pogo stick to gain leverage when undoing cranks etc.

    It’s quite nice to use too as it has a comfortable plastic ‘grip’ at the top.

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