New Spanish Traffic Laws Come in to Effect on 9 May 2014

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  • New Spanish Traffic Laws Come in to Effect on 9 May 2014
  • simondbarnes
    Member

    All seems pretty sensible to me.

    Premier Icon bruneep
    Subscriber

    New Spanish Traffic Laws Come in to Effect on 9 May 2014
    May 8th, 2014
    On the grounds that ‘ignorance of the law is no excuse’, all drivers in Spain are advised immediately to familiarise themselves with the detail of the new traffic laws which are coming into effect on 9 May 2014 (Ley 6/2014 modificando la Ley sobre Tráfico, Circulación de Vehículos a Motor y Seguridad Vial 339/1990); a mere 21 pages!
    Among the new provisions are the following:
    1. Speeding fines apply for exceeding the limit by just 1kph! On some motorways, the speed limit is being increased from 120kph to 130kph, but in many towns, the speed limit is being reduced from 30kph to 20kph.
    2. If the Guardia Civil observe a motoring offence and note the vehicle registration number, this provides sufficient evidence to prosecute- no need for them to stop vehicles.
    3. A minimum fine of 1,000 Euros will be payable by drivers caught driving whilst double the drink drive limit or above; or in all cases for reoffending drink drivers; and drivers under the influence of drugs.
    4. The Guardia Civil can seize any vehicle carrying children without legally compliant child seats.
    5. The very specific rules as to where children must sit in the vehicle (according to age/ height) must be observed, otherwise drivers face heavy fines.
    6. Cyclists under 16 years of age must wear helmets.
    7. Drivers have much higher duties to ensure the safety of cyclists of all ages.
    8. Speed camera/ radar detectors are prohibited.
    9. An EU Directive is to be implemented so that driving offences committed in one EU country are reported to the EU country of registration of the vehicle in question.
    10. Much stricter rules are being implemented for the Spanish registration of foreign registered vehicles kept in Spain.
    The above is by no means exhaustive. As can be seen, the new rules are far reaching. Knowledge of the details and observation of the requirements in practice is of fundamental importance.
    It is clear from the increased powers to prosecute and fine drivers, that the Spanish Authorities ‘mean business’ with these important legal changes.

    http://legal4spain.com/blog/

    Premier Icon chickenman
    Subscriber

    Might put me off ever hiring a car in Spain again: Last time we were in Spain we experienced the Guardia Civil’s entrapment policies first hand; not a pleasant experience.

    Jujuuk68
    Member

    And who decides what these rather ill defined “Higher duties” are?

    Sounds like the usual knee jerk ill thought out politicians revenue raising bollocks to me.

    TheDTs
    Member

    Tell me more Chickenman.? Hiring a car this summer from Allicante airport. Last time I drove abroad was in Switzerland and got fined very efficiently by them so got to be more careful this time.

    iffoverload
    Member

    does this mean the Guardia Civil can no longer sit around in bars drinking alcohol in uniform then drive off back to “work” 🙂

    bob_summers
    Member

    Typical stw. A law that insists on 1.5 m passing room for cyclists and you moan about it.

    The full press release from the dot equivalent here
    http://www.dgt.es/es/prensa/notas-de-prensa/2014/El-Congreso-de-los-Diputados-aprueba-la-Ley-sobre-Trafico-Circulacion-de-Vehiculos-a-Motor-y-Seguridad-Vial.shtml

    Seems like a good move to me.

    Rob Hilton
    Member

    All seems pretty sensible to me.

    This:

    If the Guardia Civil observe a motoring offence and note the vehicle registration number, this provides sufficient evidence to prosecute- no need for them to stop vehicles.

    stands out as being a bit worrying & open to abuse, especially in a country where corruption (not just within the police) is said to be rife.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    simondbarnes wrote:

    All seems pretty sensible to me.

    +1 What’s the beef?

    devash
    Member

    I have a Spanish girlfriend thus spend a lot of time there.

    Their attitude to cyclists is a world apart to here.

    White Van Man does not exist there.

    Cyclists are a protected species.

    The police are a highly visible presence on the roads and uphold the law.

    All is good.

    Oh, and the weather and food are better.

    Just saying……….. 😀

    mildred
    Member

    9. An EU Directive is to be implemented so that driving offences committed in one EU country are reported to the EU country of registration of the vehicle in question.

    Despite the UK having an opt out, this is already happening with driving licences under the Schengen Agreement in respect of Police and Judicial cooperation – motoring offences.

    shifter
    Member

    20kph speed limit? 20mph is painful enough 😕

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    If the Guardia Civil observe a motoring offence and note the vehicle registration number, this provides sufficient evidence to prosecute- no need for them to stop vehicles.

    The worrying bit

    Typical stw. A law that insists on 1.5 m passing room for cyclists and you moan about it.

    I think the moaning was more about the initial

    7. Drivers have much higher duties to ensure the safety of cyclists of all ages.

    Which sounds like a bunch if BS along the lines of it’s not OK to kill people

    antigee
    Member

    had a quick read thru the English news reports and can’t find one that translates this section which come in the section on cycling :

    “- Debe guardar una separación lateral mínima de 1,5 metros.”

    as said above by someone – that is a 1.5m minimum passing separation

    😀 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀 😀

    bob_summers
    Member

    I think the moaning was more about the initial
    7. Drivers have much higher duties to ensure the safety of cyclists of all ages.

    Which sounds like a bunch if BS along the lines of it’s not OK to kill people

    Fair dos. Worth pointing out that the duties quote is from a summary provided by an expat organisation. I had a skim through the actual changes and that doesn’t appear. The implications for cyclist safety are:
    Under 16s required to wear helmet at all times (adult not required to do so in urban areas)

    Drivers can pass cyclists using the entire opposite lane where oncoming cyclists are not endangered or impeded (I think this is a roundabout way of saying drivers can cross a solid white line to pass cyclists, though the white line isn’t mentioned implicitly)

    Drivers must give cyclists 1.5m when passing (previously this applied only on certain roads on Sundays and holidays)

    There are increased penalties for alcohol and drug use while driving. You might remember xc Olympic medalist Iñaki Lejarreta was killed by a drugged driver a year or so back.

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