"might I suggest a bell gentleman" says the angry rambler…

Home Forum Bike Forum "might I suggest a bell gentleman" says the angry rambler…

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 106 total)
  • "might I suggest a bell gentleman" says the angry rambler…
  • gears_suck
    Member

    singlecrack – Member
    Gears_suck …its ment to …..its for ignorant rambler’s who refuse to move even when they know you’re there and continue to walk 5 abreast across the trail

    Sorry I guess I missed the irony on that one. 😕

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    ^ Technically a tow path is no right of way for riding, but depends on the tow path. There are many in the UK where you’re actually supposed to have a permit to ride. Many the right to ride depends on the land it’s going through also. Even the Thames is like this, though they’ve marked a cycle path through many parts now.

    One of my locals, the Wey Navigation is a permissive access for bikes. They’re allowed, but the attitude is one of tolerance and walkers, and of course those using the tow path for its actual purpose, have priority.

    user-removed – Member
    (aside from the odd wazzock).

    Haven’t heard the word wazzock in years! 😀

    muddyfool
    Member

    I get way more people apologising to me when their dog/child wanders in front of my bike than I do complaining or being awkward. But I’m always going slow enough to stop by that point so it’s not a problem and usually ends up with a bit of a competition to see who can be most apologetic and/or friendly.

    The rare times that someone does complain (usually just a ‘tut’) I just reply with a cheery greeting.

    I wonder if there is a correlation between the aggressiveness of drivers and walkers by area…

    yunki
    Member

    Spawny-eyed, parrot-faced wazzock..

    muddyfool
    Member

    those using the tow path for its actual purpose

    Now it’s not often I come across a horse-drawn narrowboat on my morning commute, but if I do I’ll be sure to give way 🙂

    yorlin
    Member

    You could try singing hymns? Or doing a full-throated evil laugh “Mu-ha-ha-ha”

    I’d pay good money for an electric bell that played Brian Blessed at people…

    kristoff
    Member

    The way some scuttle out the way I’d consider an MP3 player small speaker and some Benny hill music for your approach as they scurry out the way as if you were a freight train.

    rooney
    Member

    I mtb, road bike and run on all sorts of paths and trails. There have been lots of occasions when running at Glentress when groups of mtbers slowly pedalling up the road won’t move for a runner heading down the road on the right side of the forest road. I think they like playing chicken. I always acknowledge if on a bike or running but you get idiots all the time! One morning after a hard run heading home and feeling the worse a group didn’t move while I was running, neither did I or my elbows….. It’s easier to keep moving down a hill fast 😀

    Towing my little girl on the local cycle path annoys dog owners! This really pisses me off! I’m sure the buggy is sound proof

    We are all out for enjoyment…..it’s nice to be nice 😆

    plop_pants
    Member

    I just use a long tickle stick.

    bigrich
    Member

    we are British; get a bell and take the moral high ground. Ding it like a mofo and when they don’t move over loudly proclaim about their ignorance and rudeness.

    big_n_daft
    Member

    we are British; get a bell and take the moral high ground. Ding it like a mofo and when they don’t move over loudly proclaim about their ignorance and rudeness.

    +1000

    even if you think it’s rude, the average rambler welcomes it

    TiRed
    Member

    Bell on my commuter. A BBB Bellspace that mounts to a stem spacer. It is very discrete, takes up no space and gives a pleasant moral-higround ting!

    TooTall
    Member

    Ramblers purposely ignoring the Hope Pro 2’s silence shattering buzz, until pretty much running them over. Its like the only frequency they part the trail to, is the open sesame password of a bell ring!

    I tend to ignore numpties who have some sort of self-centred belief that their annoying hubs give them some sort of right of way – whether I’m on foot or on my bike. Stop being a chod in the countryside and try treating other users of the countryside with a little respect. You coming along at a faster pace and just expecting them to get out of YOUR important way is ignorance. You are no more or less important than they are. However, make assumptions that they should clear the way for you and you become a complete idiot.

    Premier Icon tenfoot
    Subscriber

    ^^ and for the same reason I don’t use a bell. Ringing a bell can be construed as a demand for walkers to hop out of the way.

    Everytime I meet someone, a polite “excuse me” has always worked, and if they have already moved, or seen me, a “hello” and a “thank you” go a long way to keeping both “sides” amicable.

    bartimaeus
    Member

    I’ve only once had someone tell me to ‘get a bell’… I just smiled at her as she and her group were walking in the middle of the road at the time and we’d just come up behind then.

    yorlin
    Member

    Heh.

    I once had a couple of teenagey girls say ‘what are you doing on the FOOT path??’ I got to point at the white painted bike-path sign they were standing on 😀

    edit – fair play to them, they said ‘oh’ and got out the way!

    mattsccm
    Member

    A friendly approach almost always works. however that doesn’t seem to be the fashion for many here.
    Modern ting bells don’t register with older people as a bell. Its the wrong noise, very quick and by the time they work out what it is the speeding cyclist is upon them.
    Older double ring ones work better but it is not the cool thing to do. I ride almost daily around the gravel in the FoD. Millions of walkers out. Why they use the cycle track when there are miles of other I dunno but they do. A friendly “Morning” works. Slow down , expect those surprised to react in unpredictable ways,(you wouldn’t pass a small child on a bike without much warning and care.) Give way as is courtesy when you are the faster mover, .
    Expecting a walker to move at the sound of a hub is dim-witted. I assume that’s sarcastic. How are they supposed to know what it is and I for one don’t react to an unusual sound. The again I assume that anyone with a noisy hub hasn’t made a sensible choice anyway. 😆
    Of course anyone with head phones is a complete F wit and deserves a fright.
    Just what is wrong with a touch of courtesy, respect for ones elders, and taking things slowly. Cyclist are the first to complain when some dimwit in a car passes them at speed.

    danielgroves
    Member

    Everytime I meet someone, a polite “excuse me” has always worked, and if they have already moved, or seen me, a “hello” and a “thank you” go a long way to keeping both “sides” amicable.

    This is what I do to. Don’t have a bell, and only ever had one person tell me to get one, although they had heard me coming and gotten out of the way before I would have started ringing one anyway. They certainly weren’t close enough when they shouted it to see if I had one or not.

    On the whole people are very acceptant (I find) if I just ride up behind them slowly and say “excuse me”.

    If you do want people to move quickly though, squeaky brakes work a charm. Everyone assumes they’re broken and you can’t stop.

    shamus
    Member

    I got called a very rude word for informing a gentleman who stepped across me on a 15ft wide cyclepath he should make observations before crossing the path (to the side of a busy dual carriageway, maybe his intention was to remove himself from the gene pool?) and the following rant included “you’re a f**king psychopath” whilst astride the large painted bicycle symbol. Cue my moment to shine, smug doesn’t come close.

    flybywire
    Member

    a whistle tends to attract attention from about 15feet away (just mid-pitch without an actual whistle).Then when nearer if haven’t moved open a sentence like – “please could I make my way round or is it ok I make progress? Thanks” If you whistle just have to watch out for dogs coming in from the undergrowth or up ahead and be prepared!

    gears_suck
    Member

    Came up behind a girl on the towpath t’other day who had a wondering dog on a long lead. Called out several times to no response. Finally realized she had earphones in. When I came along side her and past the dog (carefully) she about shat herself. I just don’t get it. Why come outside into our lovely countryside and then create a barrier between you and it?

    gwaelod
    Member

    devils advocate

    a rambler blocking a cyclist on a path is no different from a cyclist “taking the lane” on a road.

    in both cases 2 people are doing risk assessments of whether or not it’s safe to pass/be passed…the overtaker and the overtakee – whose risk assessment is most valid?

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Subscriber

    One of the big problems in this country is the way the small-minded are apt to take are offence whenever it suits. It doesn’t matter what method you warn people of your approach, it is always possible to complain about it. I don’t think your own attitude makes much difference ( unless you ate being really anti-social to start with.) if someone has decided that you are on their territory.

    CaptJon
    Member

    Last week i passed a walker on a shared path who actually understood what to do when i said ‘On your left’. I was shocked when he simply stepped a little further to the right without even looking.

    I approach, reduce speed, at about 15-20ft away, announce my presence “excuse me please, cyclist to your right”. Probably 50% of the time it works, the rest of the time ending in chaos – if people can’t understand this though, should they really be let out?

    Premier Icon cardo
    Subscriber

    I always try to be polite, slow down and say thanks…. Ignore any comments and focus on the next bit of my ride.
    The chances are I’m having a better journey than they are.
    Joggers with headphones in are fair game to be honest.

    Premier Icon Gilesey
    Subscriber

    No bell here, always just slow right down and say hello/thank you on way past. Save the “hard stare” for the occasional idiots.

    Old dear yesterday made me laugh. She was at the back of a group of elderly ramblers and noticed me, shouted “BIKE!” several time to the rest of the group. Not one of them heard her or made a move.

    “Just run ’em over” she told me as I went by.

    Premier Icon simmy
    Subscriber

    Most people are fine if you slow down, hold back and keep the Pro 2 rumbling 😆

    I got stuck behind a Jogger with Earphones in for 15 Mins a while ago. I could have got past but the young lady was a lovely sight at the end of a long ride 8)

    singlecrack
    Member

    Tbh …..it’s very rare to get an ignorant rambler where I ride …… Most of them are very friendly and are happy to chat as you pass ……..it’s like life in general …. just the odd idiot that ruins it

    mangatank
    Member

    Went through this sort of BS for years on the towpath commute. Eventually stopped using the bell and adopted the warning phrase of ‘look out behind’. I wanted something that would prick up ears ‘look out!’ and give a direction for the warning ‘behind’. Sounds idiotically simplistic but I’ve never had a bad experience since adopting it several years ago. The tone you deliver it with, and the following Hugh Grant-esque ‘Awfully sorry. Thank you so much’ is crucial to success.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Technically a tow path is no right of way for riding, but depends on the tow path. There are many in the UK where you’re actually supposed to have a permit to ride. Many the right to ride depends on the land it’s going through also. Even the Thames is like this, though they’ve marked a cycle path through many parts now.

    Not so now, the Canal and River Trust seem to be taking a responsible access approach like Scotland as detailed here. A bit odd to restrict bike access on a towpath as their designation would make them a de facto bridleway due to historic horse use on them for a 100 plus years.

    devash
    Member

    Too many selfish, intolerant people on a small, overpopulated island.

    Welcome to Britain. 😀

    bellefied
    Member

    I use a bell and as has been suggested before, start ringing it well away from my target, if that doesn’t work, I say loudly “excuse me”, if that doesn’t work, I try to edge past until they notice me and jump out of the way, and I say “thank you” and I mean it 😀

    Never had any negative comments, even when I’ve been travelling at speed 😆

    yunki
    Member

    and I say “thank you” and I mean it

    I think this is pretty much the most important comment so far..

    Anyone who doesn’t respond well to heartfelt common courtesy is a wally and will get what’s coming to them..
    And the same goes for them that can’t apply it.. 8)

    Premier Icon FOG
    Subscriber

    The more remote you are often the more friendly the rambler. The ones who have just walked a hundred metres from the car can be the most awkward especially as they seem to be the ones with herds of dogs and toddlers.

    Rob Hilton
    Member

    A bit odd to restrict bike access on a towpath as their designation would make them a de facto bridleway due to historic horse use on them for a 100 plus years

    Not as odd as horses not being allowed on them, but there is some argument that they would need a load more maintenance with big beasties trampling around.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Subscriber

    Too many selfish, intolerant people on a small, overpopulated island.

    Most of them posting on STW

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Interesting point Rob. I wonder how much, if any, extra maintenance would be required given that there would be less horses than when the navigations were in use and the load would be smaller too as they wouldn’t be dragging 50tons of load.

    nikk
    Member

    FOG wrote:

    The more remote you are often the more friendly the rambler.

    It is worth bearing in mind that that rambler you passed 15 miles from nowhere may be the person to pull you off a rock and administer first aid and call for help… and vice-versa if they got into difficulty.

    Petty “who’s trail is it anyway” middle class first word problems nonsense pales into insignificance when one human is giving lifesaving help to another miles from nowhere.

    Worth bearing in mind.

    Doesn’t work quite the same on towpaths in the middle of town though.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 106 total)

The topic ‘"might I suggest a bell gentleman" says the angry rambler…’ is closed to new replies.

Comments are closed, but trackbacks are open.

Skip to top