I have no idea what my next bike should be and its really annoying.

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  • I have no idea what my next bike should be and its really annoying.
  • I’d say stick with the Soul and learn the proper techniques for riding the terrain you want to ride.

    Premier Icon AndyRT
    Subscriber

    How tall are you as I am selling my Blur LTc frame and fork (Lyric) which sounds about perfect for your needs….

    I bought a Krampus and seem to be riding faster with a bigger smile on my face. it then I have a Glory for the really BIG days

    mansonsoul
    Member

    I’ve got a Prophet, bought second hand. It’s awesome. I run a tapered fork, a gravity dropper, 1×10, short stem and wide bars. It is light, fun and great in the gnar.

    And cheap as chips on the Bay.

    Premier Icon tomaso
    Subscriber

    The standard response is…

    <inset forum name> I would recommend <insert own bike make and model> because it is the bestest and chosed it :mrgreen:

    I would recommend a few demo days – blow some cash on test rides. Or blag your mates bikes.

    seanthesheap
    Member

    I have to say jones, it’s way better downhill and on technical stuff than my Solaris was, solaris felt faster though, and was way cheaper, i need to get rid of the Cotic if you fancy trying one cheap.

    seanthesheap
    Member

    Tomaso speaks sense…..^^

    iolo
    Member

    Get a penny farthing. Next years cool next best thing.

    slimjim78
    Member

    I’d say stick with the Soul and learn the proper techniques for riding the terrain you want to ride.

    15+ years, im still no closer to taking on the proper gnar. The real steep descents terrify me. I need all the help I can get!

    How tall are you as I am selling my Blur LTc frame and fork – I bought a Krampus and seem to be riding faster

    Im 6’1″. I was checking out the Krampus last night, they certainly look fun. Can they genuinely keep up/beat a ‘normal’ suspended bike around ‘normal’ trails?

    ve got a Prophet, bought second hand. It’s awesome. I run a tapered fork, a gravity dropper, 1×10, short stem and wide bars

    Pretty much exactly how I would set mine up. Asides from 26″ wheels I think this is one of my best options

    15+ years, im still no closer to taking on the proper gnar. The real steep descents terrify me. I need all the help I can get!

    To start with, get a dropper seatpost or move your saddle out of the way.

    Premier Icon benji
    Subscriber

    Why not invest in a skills day and learn to ride what you have rather than thinking that buying bike x will make me super at riding, you will still be scared just more comfortable.

    Premier Icon Cheezpleez
    Subscriber

    A dropper post (with remote) would be a good start. Makes a big difference IMO.

    Bigger wheels won’t help you take on bigger drops. They do smooth out the trail a bit but they won’t soak up hits any better than 26in wheels.

    By all means try a full sus but don’t get more travel/burliness/weight than you really need. That is, unless you’re prepared to spoil 95% of your riding for the sake of a bit more confidence on the other 5%

    Tapered steerers, 650b, Maxle rear ends, tubeless, 20mm more travel – they’re all pretty marginal changes IME.

    toppers3933
    Member

    Skills session with Jedi or greatrock (others are available) would work wonders for you.

    mansonsoul
    Member

    This is all true. The dropper post was bought 2nd hand on here years ago, and fitted to the Cotic Simple I had at the time. I was revolutionary for my riding on xc loops, no more pausing to lower my saddle or not bothering and then not being able to really rip the downhill. I can’t recommend a remote dropper post more highly.

    nwgiles
    Member

    iolo – Member
    Get a penny farthing. Next years cool next best thing.

    Is this a 29er front with 24 rear?

    slimjim78
    Member

    Long story short as poss (as I accidently just deleted a virtual essay)

    I feel like I need a bit more help getting down gnarly descents/trails.

    I’ve ridden 26″ hardtails for years and love my Cotic Soul but am trying to take on bigger drops and jumps and think im ready to try bigger wheels and/or full suss.

    I should be clear, my skills are average at best, but at my age im running out of years to become Rad on a hardtail.. And ive had skills training and will be taking more.

    Trouble is I have no real idea what to look for or try out. Or indeed if I should switch to full suss at all.
    I like the sound of 650b, tapered steerers, dropper posts and all that jazz – but ultimately am here for your advice.

    My current wish list:

    2nd hand Cannondale Prophet (to dabble with full suss?)
    Zesty
    Orange 5
    Solaris

    I dont like:

    Trek’s
    Spesh (although Camber looks OK I s’pose)

    I guess I want a robust all rounder, capable of all day riding, doesnt weigh a ton , with somewhere around 120-140mm travel. Ideally it wont require a 2nd mortgage to purchase either.

    What say you?

    slimjim78
    Member

    i need to get rid of the Cotic if you fancy trying one cheap

    Size?

    The standard response is…
    <inset forum name> I would recommend <insert own bike make and model> because it is the bestest and chosed it
    I would recommend a few demo days – blow some cash on test rides

    Yes this is the sensible reposne. Ive breifly demoed an Intense Spyder 29er and quite likes the big wheel feel. Im also hoping to trial a Transition Bandit 29er soon

    slimjim78
    Member

    A dropper post (with remote) would be a good start. Makes a big difference IMO.

    Yes im really keen to try this, stuck with 27.2mm options at the moment though and from research ive done the options arent the greatest (pre Thomson releasing theirs)

    Skills session with Jedi

    Funny enough Ive just literally recived a response from Tony regarding a follow up session..

    Premier Icon AndyRT
    Subscriber

    The Krampus I built has a lefty, or Hefty I should say (yes,I am that funny) and so far I am matching or bettering my previous times. (I happen to use Strava to measure my own improvement as I hopefully move from Shirehorse, to Irish Cob and finally to Italian Stallion ( I can dream…as does my wife)

    It’s a lot of fun in a way that seems to make little sense other than full sus seems over the top on the UK trails. but it depends why you ride…

    If you want to go faster for longer and be all gnar n stuff then go full sus.

    If you want to keep the greatness of a good hard tail but add a couple of extra dimensions, such as ridiculous climbing and cornering grip and stupendous amounts of momentum, then I would seriously suggest having a go on a Krampus.

    Added bonus last night of explaining to a random bloke asking for a 29er tube from me in the Swinely car park, that my inner tube is bigger than his tyres. He looked at me like I was talking utter rubbish until my hand gesture moved his gaze towards my Knards. Enlightenment followed.

    Jumps and stuff are fun, but enjoying all of the trails is even more fun.

    slimjim78
    Member

    can I have a go Andy?!

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    Yup, doubt very much that the bike would be a limiting factor in trying bigger stuff. Skills training, practice, session stuff, even read a book (Lopes’s book is a good place to start.)

    On the other hand, if you just fancy a new bike then go for it 🙂 I’d keep the soul though and go for something for a different type of riding.

    Premier Icon AndyRT
    Subscriber

    Sure.

    Could meet up in Swinely or Frimley if you ever get out that way?

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I’m going to jump to the natural conclusion, that you just want another bike, and the reasons you’ve given are basically irrelevant 😉 But despite that- it’s easier to learn a skill on a more forgiving bike, then apply it back to your hardtail, than it’ll be to learn it on the hardtail- there’s tons of stuff I’ll now ride on my Ragley that I wouldn’t have done if I’d not already done it on my Hemlock (and same for the Hemlock and the 224) It’s a bit of a safety rope.

    Out of your list, probably the Five, they’re a bit normal/ordinary but ordinary is good unless you’re looking for special, which you aren’t because you know if you’re looking for special. Simples. I don’t actually like ’em very much but I understand the appeal, they do the job in a straightforward predictable way. And give you a nice bit of clear blue water between what you have.

    See also- Stumpy Evo. Zesty maybe, are you buying used? Rocket maybe if you’re a fanboy. Mondraker SuperUgly RR. Stuff like that. Everything in your list is good but the Solaris probably makes least sense.

    slimjim78
    Member

    mr blobby – I like your advice, and yes I am investing in all of it (training etc, and most likley a new bike!)

    Andy – ive been meaning to try out the ‘new’ Swinley sections all year, would be a great excuse.

    slimjim78
    Member

    I’m going to jump to the natural conclusion, that you just want another bike, and the reasons you’ve given are basically irrelevant

    Yes & No!
    I certainly have the new bike itch. Real itchy.
    But ive also been out lots and witnessed the fact I am now a minority by pluggin away on my hardtail. And the full sussers all make it look so easy!
    So my natural (convenient) correlation..

    Yes, the 5 seems to fit me well I think. I like the fuglyness of them too.

    Premier Icon AndyRT
    Subscriber

    Let me know when you can make it, my mail address is in my profile.

    Premier Icon Normal Man
    Subscriber

    You say Camber looks ok. I bought my ’12 Expert 26er about this time last year but then got an injury (non-cycling but stopped me cycling) in late Nov. I only got back riding in May. Plus I’ve just bought a 29er ht which suits what I can do now. Long and short of it is the Camber is hardly used and could go for the right price.

    Let me know if you are interested and I’ll email over pics, etc.

    slimjim78
    Member

    sure, will happily take a look if size large + ?

    Premier Icon Normal Man
    Subscriber

    Yes, it’s a large.

    I’ll email you.

    Premier Icon oxym0r0n
    Subscriber

    AndyRT – hope you had a good ride on Dartmoor the other day 😉

    Premier Icon AndyRT
    Subscriber

    I did thanks. Cleared a lot of cobwebs out. Had a lot of fun going slightly off piste on the way back. Very dusty and fun. Love riding there.

    seanthesheap
    Member

    Medium, blue / white.

    slimjim78
    Member

    Heck, sorry Sean I could only go for a Large otherwise id probably have bitten your arm off.

    Ask people for a go of thier bikes (nicely) its all down to how you feel on the bike, not how people tell you you’ll feel.

    matther01
    Member

    +1 Northwind comments

    Premier Icon roverpig
    Subscriber

    If you are 6’1″ and fancy a Five then you could take a look at the frames from Bike Scene

    http://www.bikescene.co.uk/ORANGECLEARANCEFRAMES-107.html

    I’m just building mine up and can’t fault their service. I won’t pretend it is the best bike or even the best bike for you, only you can decide that. But you probably won’t be able to get a new one as cheap for a while. At least until they go back to 26″ and have to dump all those 650b frames anyway 🙂

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    But despite that- it’s easier to learn a skill on a more forgiving bike, then apply it back to your hardtail, than it’ll be to learn it on the hardtail- there’s tons of stuff I’ll now ride on my Ragley that I wouldn’t have done if I’d not already done it on my Hemlock (and same for the Hemlock and the 224) It’s a bit of a safety rope.

    Sort of agree with this. Certainly riding a big full suss made me rethink what I could ride and the speed i could carry on a bike which then carries over to riding the hardtail.

    Though reckon skills are better to learn on a HT as you really need to be pumping, manualing, hopping the bike about to carry speed over technical trails. A hardtail definitely lets you know if you are getting it right or wrong! Can’t think of many better bikes to practice these sorts of skills on than a Soul.

    DanW
    Member

    Kind of agree with Northwind but would err more towards the opinion that if you can’t ride something on a hardtail then a full sus won’t magically make it rideable.

    You can often ride faster on a full sus and save some energy on the longer rides but in terms of actually riding a line I wouldn’t say there is much in it personally. A dropper post may be a practical help, tapered steerers/ different wheel sizes/ etc make naff all difference to a line you might or might not try and ride.

    The biggest issue is mental and the commitment required, especially on the steeper stuff you mention… maybe a full sus would give you that confidence even if in reality there is little difference (unless you are doing a rather large drop in to a very rough landing or similar)?

    I also personally like short travel full sus or hardtails to feel a bit more “connected” to what is going on rather than let a long travel bike dull a lot of what is happening under the wheels (a generalisation I realise!). That is just personal and I am sure a longer travel bike might be faster on some descents but if don’t like the look of a line then the amount of travel the bike has won’t change that 😀

    There really is no compensation for skills and technique but perhaps the mental benefits of confidence and having a shiny new bike are worth it 😉 As others have said, a lot of it comes down to experience too- if you ride a certain line at a certain speed once you kind of get a better idea of what is possible and the confidence grows from there

    deanfbm
    Member

    A full sus or bigger wheels is the last thing that’s going to help you out on jumps and drops if that’s what you’re wanting to get better at. Best way of getting better at that stuff is getting the saddle all the way down, flat pedals, and spend a few hours a week practising bunny hops/manuals/dropping off curbs etc. Get strong when it comes to standing up ie try and do a loop standing up the whole time.

    For rough stuff, yea a full sus will make it tonnes easier.

    Out of interest, you say you struggle with steep, what travel are your forks and how much sag do you run? Running too soft will make things steep and nervous.

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