Half marathon in 50 days

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  • Half marathon in 50 days
  • Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    You could walk a half marathon is less time than that.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Thanks, want a 1:45 ish time

    prawny
    Member

    Be born a good runner.

    Sub 2 hours is good. 1:45 is very good, if you’re asking now I think you might be too late.

    Unless like I said, you were born a good runner/have been a good runner earlier in life.

    Edit- for balance I did I half marathon in october last year, started training properly in about april/may time, slacked off a bit over the summer and rode my bike more but from the end of august focused totally on running. I managed 2:05 and I don’t think I could have gone much faster, I was HR Zone 3.9-4.5 the whole way round. Tailed off a bit after 9ish mile when my knees went though, I was probably on for 1.59ish

    johndoh
    Member

    Don’t run too much would be my advice – if you go out running loads straight away you’ll end up damaging yourself.

    Start slow, if you have cardio fitness from biking you will run too far and then be unable to walk for weeks – just do a half mile run, rest two days then up it a little, remembering to take rest days to recover.

    Ohh, and don’t believe the hype about getting ‘proper’ running shoes fitted with gait analysis and all that rubbish – just ensure you have a nice comfortable pair of decent running shoes.

    EDIT: And I trained three/four times a week for 9 months (from a standing start having never run before) to complete the Great North Run in 1hr 46min. Unless you are very fit I doubt you’ll be able to get sub two hours if you haven’t started training yet.

    wors
    Member

    do you run now, or starting from scratch?

    Run every other day, start off running for 10 minutes then increase by a couple of minutes each session

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    run a lot??!

    Avoid that. The worst thing is to get an over-running injury – says a man with achilles tendonitis now. Run smart not long.

    Depends on where you are now. I would priorities steady accumulation of miles (6-7 milers) and some speed work.

    But if you get any sign of achilles, calf, foot pain pull back immediately.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    So background is everytime I run this I don’t train I use my bike fitness ( and a whole heap of stubbornness ) and run 2hrs (it hurts)

    I ran 5k the other morning and it was okay went steady took 27mins (2nd time I’d run this year, other time was in Jan)

    Thought I might train this year..

    Got 50 days

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    With 50 days, my advice would be to focus on enjoying rather than pushing too hard and getting injured.

    Do some yassos for speed work and gradually up the 5k distance every three days or so.

    But just have fun. Its a 10 mile jog to a three mile “race” – leave enough for the second “half”

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    What can I do to get ready other than run a lot??!

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Subscriber

    5k in 27 mins is 8:42 min/mile pace (was that a pace you think you could sustain for 2hrs?) You’d need to up that to 8 min/mile pace to get a 1:45. If you don’t run much then that sort of gain from training just might be achievable, though going from 2hrs to 1:45 is a huge jump.

    Try and up your pace a bit too. Your target pace for half marathon is 8 min/mile so you really need to be looking to be comfortable running at that sort of pace. With 50 days to go I’d focus more on that than slow distance work. Do you have a way of measuring your pace so you know you’re running at the right speed?

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Not sure I could keep that going for 2hrs, could try 10k tomorrow and see if I can

    I have Strava app that seems to tell me my pace

    Tallpaul
    Member

    Firstly, I very much doubt you’ll achieve a 1:45 if you are running 27 min 5 kms with 7 weeks to go.

    Realistically, you have 6 weeks to train and some time to taper. If you really can run a 2:00 with no training, then I’m sure there’s room for improvement. However, if you go out today and start pushing 8:00 min/miles I’d predict an injury before you see any improvement.

    If I were in your position, I’d start running 5 km 2/3 times per week and do a long run once a week. I’d start at 10 km and up the long run by 2 km per week to peak at 18 km at week 5, then run a 10 km on week 6. If you want to work on you pace, only focus on this during your 5 km runs. The long runs should just be about completing the distance.

    stevehine
    Member

    Would echo exactly what Tallpaul said – one run a week focusing on distance; three short runs a week aiming to build speed. I’d maybe be tempted to do long run on Sunday; 5k easy on a Monday; hill intervals on Wednesday and a fast 5k on a Friday

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Right I’ll try that! 5k’s regular with a longer run once a week

    I’ll STRAVA!!!! the runs and paste them into this thread and we’ll see how we get on :-/

    the teaboy
    Member

    What TallPaul said.

    Bear in mind that it takes 3 weeks for a stress fracture to appear so don’t jump into doing loads because you’re feeling great as you can do real damage.

    I’d suggest a weekly diet of:
    – one longer steadier run to get you used to time on your feet
    – one run up to 6km at race pace to build endurance (start at 4*1km with a minute’s rest between, then build towards 1*6km)
    – two easy runs to work on being light on your feet and good running style

    egb81
    Member

    Ohh, and don’t believe the hype about getting ‘proper’ running shoes fitted with gait analysis and all that rubbish – just ensure you have a nice comfortable pair of decent running shoes.

    Getting properly fitted running shoes made a big, positive difference for my shonky knee. Definitely worth it if you’re having pains or problems.

    johndoh
    Member

    Getting properly fitted running shoes made a big, positive difference for my shonky knee. Definitely worth it if you’re having pains or problems.

    It had the opposite effect for me – years of running in my particular style was ‘corrected’ which then led to knee and ankle problems.

    craigxxl
    Member

    It had the opposite effect for me – years of running in my particular style was ‘corrected’ which then led to knee and ankle problems.

    Same here. Had the gait analysis and was recommended support shoes. Stuck with my usual brand of Mizuno and within 30km’s my shins and knees were knackered so had to lay off running for a while. It was the only joint injuries I’d had despite being a heavy runner. Went back to my neutral shoes and although the first few runs caused my knees to ache no problem since.
    I think there is a big difference to how you run on a treadmill for the analysis and how you run on the roads.

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Subscriber

    Thanks, want a 1:45 ish time

    Watching with interest. Don’t think it’ll work (you’ll need to increase your speed by 30% and maintain it for four times longer).

    I’d aim to get round it in 2 hours 30 and enjoy yourself, since going at 1:45 pace will knacker you within three miles and ruin the whole experience.

    Good luck though.

    Premier Icon spawnofyorkshire
    Subscriber

    I’d suggest giving yourself a target of sub-2hrs to start with then build from that.
    I trained to hit 1:45 for months, i’m a 22 min 5km runner and was consistently and easily sub-50 min on my 10km hilly training routes, but one niggly ankle injury and I hit 1:53 in my last 1/2 marathon instead
    Don’t underestimate the effort involved in dropping time and being able to consistently hold it. Set realistic goals for yourself and have a look at some of the plans online for improving your speed and endurance

    thecaptain
    Member

    The best thing you can do is just run more. Run fairly easily, perhaps 60-90 secs per mile slower than you would be racing. Build up number of runs per week and max length of run, but don’t do it too rapidly or you might get injured. 10% per week (for both total mileage and max run length) is often quoted as a rule of thumb but you can probably push that a bit to be honest. If you’re up to racing 5k quite hard maybe you could go and jog 8k twice a week right away, and take it from there. How about max runs of 8, 10, 12, 15, 18 over successive weeks and a bit of a taper before the 21.1.

    Premier Icon phinbob
    Subscriber

    If you intend to keep riding your bike then use that for recovery.

    If you’re up for a ‘death or glory’ approach then:

    3 runs a week, one long (build to 10 miles?), one mid distance (4ish) but at or near your ‘race pace’ and one where you do some short intervals, say 3-6 X 400m with a rest in between. With 6 weeks to go I might build up slowly for two weeks – (do some, but not too fast intervals), have two weeks of harder work and then taper down for two weeks. You can keep the fast running in there as you taper, just cut the number of intervals.

    The intervals are the sessions where you stand to gain most but also are the risky ones. You don’t need to go all-out – if you do then something may well go ‘ping’. Try and complete each one at the same pace each session, and just run at an ‘uncomfortable’ pace, then rest, then do it again.

    When you get near the race, *then* you can set your goal. Based only my personal experience, take your last long run 10-11 mile pace, then take maybe 10-15 seconds per mile off of that (to account for that boost a race gives you).

    Don’t run faster than that, at least for the first 8-9 miles. If you are feeling great at mile 8-9, try pushing the pace for a mile or two, if you feel good at mile 11, push it again.

    Do it that way and you will be passing all the people who set off 30s a mile faster than their longest run pace and have now blown up. It’s far more motivating to be reeling in a steady stream of runners for the last 5 miles than to be passed because you have gone off too hard.

    Just my 2p’s worth.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Run 1 – 5km – Done!!

    Felt okay, battery ran out on phone so bit of a learning there, reckon it will have been a < 25min 5k so I think thats my target time for now.

    https://www.strava.com/activities/670912637/embed/7d4ef7bcdda3aafbe81dca5b3eed7f227295882c

    thecaptain
    Member

    Yup. Now run slower and longer. Well, not right now, but next time you go for a run. TBH if you are already running occasionally without getting bad DOMS you are off to a decent start, better than most cyclists and certainly better than I was 5 or 6 years ago.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    What are DOMS? <Edit: Googled It – Get that if I play Squash!!! after not playing for a while>

    To say it was only my third run this year, it felt okay, not easy but okay.

    May try a slower 10k next

    thecaptain
    Member

    DOMS is when your thighs go sore and you can’t walk downstairs a day or two after running.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delayed_onset_muscle_soreness

    Common for a cyclist who goes out for a very occasional run.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    3 whiskys in and 10k later this morning is looking unlikely

    Premier Icon twisty
    Subscriber

    You are in luck, as i have exactly what you need!

    Training plan

    the result

    Training plan is the usual thing of a bit of intervals to develop speed and some distance work to train for the distance peaking 2 weeks before and then tapering for the last week.

    Obs with any training YMMV but I started massively unfit and the race was tropical so in theroy it would be easier for a regular cyclist in the UK.

    I find the tricky thing as from a non runny history is not ruining achellies/hamstrings etc which affects training. I did change my technique to make sure i landed my heel shortly after footstrike rather than keeping my heel off the ground throughout my stride which i think helped a lot. Its better to have some heavier cushioned training shoes too.

    Premier Icon mrl
    Subscriber

    I think it should be possible. I was running 10k in 50min about twice a month. I then tried to maintain that pace for a half marathon without doing any intermediate distance runs. Did it in 5.07min km. So lost a bit of pace but made the distance. Completely flat run though. So I reckon if you can get 10kppm to the time you want you should be able to get sub 2hr. No idea about training programs but I reckon just push a bit harder each week, get the pace first and then extend the distance.

    Premier Icon jacobff
    Subscriber

    As a biker who came to running late and now seems to run more than bike, here are my tips.

    Be kind to your body, if it hurts stop. Find out why and fix it.

    Also try and do at least 10 body weight lunges and squats and some planks a couple of times a week. The extra flexibility and strength will help a lot.

    You may find this quite painful initially as I found that I had strong quads (front of leg) and weak glutes (your behind) from cycling.

    Best of luck and have fun. Also vasaline or sport lube for longer distances or if it’s raining will help.

    highlandman
    Member

    Timings are just numbers and forcing things to hit a numerical target will just lead to injury. Speed and performance are dependant upon listening to your body, developing steadily and on enjoying what you’re doing.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Okay just did a lumpy 10k

    Took the pace back and felt good and could have gone further even increased last km pace to bring it in under an hour

    https://www.strava.com/activities/681335275

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    DOMS!!!!!

    Seems that climbing a 900m fell with a 10 year old that dances up like a mountain goat and weighs as much as I’m overweight by, followed by a 10k run with an elevation profile like Wizbit

    = DOMs

    I now have complete and utter leg shut down, somebody has replaced my calve muscles with painful jelly and my brain now looks at steps with a fear and anxiety only previously reserved for dentist chairs.

    Ouch!!!

    Premier Icon cloudnine
    Subscriber

    Go for a brisk walk.. Active recovery!
    Then into the ice bath and a Thai massage to finish you off

    thecaptain
    Member

    Look on the bright side, you can run through it anyway, it’s not like a proper injury, it just hurts.

    I’m up to 7km thrice a week, just over 45-50 mins. Had DOMS last week as I did a tough hilly 50mile Road ride. I’m planning the one longer run a week starting this coming Friday.
    Got two months to a 38 miler. From no running a few weeks ago. To be fair I probably won’t do it as there’s no real interest.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Thai massage booked!! Found advert in back of free paper.

    They offered an optional ‘Happy ending” not sure what that is but sounded good.

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Got two months to a 38 miler. From no running a few weeks ago.

    Run? Are you mental….??!!??

    Premier Icon cloudnine
    Subscriber

    A proper Thai massage will have you almost begging for them to stop.. The happy ending is when it’s all over and you get to leave… No pain.. no gain as mine tells me as she laughs sadistically

    Premier Icon Tiger6791
    Subscriber

    Set off to do 5K today and bailed because of knee pain, I’ll try again tomorrow

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