discrimination at work…

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  • discrimination at work…
  • I might be missing something here as I have only skimmed the thread but I am not sure how you think your wife was shafted over maternity. She was a band 5 and for the period of her maternity was elevated to band 6 which presumably means she will have been paid at a higher rate during maternity. At face value that looks like someone was looking after her. Expecting to keep the higher band when coming back sounds like someone being a bit greedy especially if it was explained at the start. Now if your wife starts to get a bit huffy about this I can understand why senior manager may not be seeing her in a favourable light and they may be seeing it as a sign of things to come, so best avoid it and not give her the new job. But as I said, I may be missing some important detail there.

    If the new lass really is unqualified for the new role then I would expect her to be exposed fairly quickly and she will then be needing to find a way to get the answers she needs. That may then be the next choice your wife faces as she may be one of the people the young lass comes to for advice. Will she help her out or let her fend for herself? I agree with the other posters though. However unfair it may seem now I can’t see any benefit in kicking up a fuss over it. That will only end badly for her. Suck it up and decide what she wants to do longer term. If she likes the job she is doing then crack on with it and do it the best of her ability. Ask for more detailed feedback on her interview though and where she perhaps underperformed as she wants to use it as a learning experience so that she is better prepared for future opportunities. Sure, she may express that she is disappointed to have not got the role but realises that she may not have come across well enough in the interview and wants to improve. Then see where that takes her. No good being bitter about it though.

    gonzy
    Member

    bikingcatastrophe – just to be clear to you my wife is on a band 4 salary and the person who is covering while she is on maternity is being paid at band 5 for doing the same job, during this time the maternity pay my wife has received has been on band 4…when she returns she will still be paid at band 4…
    also the girl who got the job did not meet the essential criteria in the job spec so should not even had got an interview

    maybe you should try reading the comments properly before making your conclusions….

    the discrimination is due to what they have done with her salary grading while she has been off on maternity….
    as for the recruitment process its less a case of discrimination and more a case of nepotism…
    either way its a stitch up and the best way to describe whats happened i will quote Miffy and Mundiesmiester:

    [/quote]As for the mat cover and appointment of new role it does sound as if your misses was shafted.
    I think the managerial team liked the other girl and she proved herself whole on covering the position and the new role was a ‘done deal’ for her and they held show interviews to prove an open and fair practice.

    Definetly something fundamentally wrong there if the other candidate did not meet essential qualifications/experience and in addition if HR confirmed that your wife scored highest.
    Something very strange happening in the process.

    hora
    Member

    From what I understand its all* flex-time, flexi-lunch, extended lunches for shopping allowed, work from home etc etc.

    *All but the emergency services and people on the lowest-rung/pay.

    Junkyard
    Member

    I suspect your subtle troll will work well Hora and we are blessed you found time ,in the cut and thrust of the private sector, to send it

    Thanks

    You can fly up the NHS bands quickly – in 12 months, my wife went from Band 2 (Health Care Assistant) to Band 6 (currently covering for someone who’s a Band 7).

    You have to be very good and very driven to move from unskilled (as in a no formal qualifications) HCA to Department management level in 12 months – not many HCA’s have that drive or ability.

    And it’s not so quick in nursing – 3 year degree to get Band 5, couple of years to apply for Ward Sister posts (Band 6) and a couple more for Ward/Department Manager (Band 7). Some might do it a bit quicker but not by much and the norm would be for much longer than 2 years between bands, especially as you are often waiting for someone to die or retire.

    hels
    Member

    Binners !! Where did you find that picture of me ?? I’m callin my lawyers !!

    julianwilson
    Member

    You have to be very good and very driven to move from unskilled (as in a no formal qualifications) HCA to Department management level in 12 months – not many HCA’s have that drive or ability.

    …and agenda for change a few years back regraded (in a downwards direction!) posts that didn’t carry significant managment responsibility and risk (often of actual human lives rather than financial risk), and crucially didn’t require some significant or postgraduate graduate level qualification and several years relevant experience.

    Perhaps xiphon’s mrs was in a b2 hca post but with some other non-nursing and significant qualifications and experience under her belt that meant she had the person spec for a different much higher (and I assume non-nursing) post. As an example, I have in the past employed a couple of psychology graduates as mental health HCA’s as they wanted the experience (and bleddy good at their jobs they were too), and who have then gone straight on (quite ‘properly’ in terms of person spec/experience) to be B5 psychology assistants or B6 doctorate trainee clinical psychologists.

    Going back to the OP’s wife’s post however, I would still be interested to hear what creative HR shenanigans let an underqualified and underexperienced finance bod cover someone’s maternity leave paid a whole band above the original post (the grief we have had covering maternity leave at all sometimes, let alone for more money!!), and then leapfrog to a higher band again in the same area without the person spec. 😕

    Perhaps xiphon’s mrs was in a b2 hca post but with some other non-nursing and significant qualifications and experience under her belt that meant she had the person spec for a different much higher (and I assume non-nursing) post

    Which what I badly alluded to (was talking unqualified in respect of the job she was doing not her per se).

    and agenda for change a few years back regraded (in a downwards direction!) posts that didn’t carry significant managment responsibility and risk (often of actual human lives rather than financial risk),

    Indeed.

    xiphon
    Member

    @julianwilson

    Pretty much hit the nail on the head – she had been a HCA at the hospital since aged 16 (part time job), and did occasional shifts for some money (and to keep her on payroll).

    Initially she covered for a ward clerk, then she was seconded to a junior governance position, then applied for a permanent role in governance, then somehow bumped up another grade or two.

    I guess the NHS thought her “qualifications” (BSc & MSc) meant she could probably be more use than HCA.

    (I don’t think the fact her mother is a Matron at the same hospital had any influence… 😉 )

    It’s just a temp job until she secures PhD funding though.

    grum
    Member

    Just sounds like a lot of typical public sector, not-living-in-the-real-world whining to me!

    Getting unions involved? For the love of God! Seriously?

    You do have an interesting mix of seemingly quite left wing politics mixed with the classic ‘Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells’ Daily Mail reader ethos. 🙂

    stevepitch
    Member

    Having only flicked through the thread one thing seems very odd to me, why the hell would your wife want to stay somewhere where someone has it in for her?? As above three months, head down, move on. I know it’s not right or fair especially if she enjoys working there but seriously why hang around?

    FuzzyWuzzy
    Member

    ‘Move on’ is simple to type but not so simple in practice, there’s not a whole lot of jobs out there anyway and I imagine moving on within the NHS is probably a bit of a minefield anyway, especially if a director has it in for you.

    grahamg
    Member

    On the plus side, she actually has qualifications that means she’s actually employable outside the NHS, so at least there’s an alternative route that is often not available to clinical staff.

    gonzy
    Member

    Having only flicked through the thread one thing seems very odd to me, why the hell would your wife want to stay somewhere where someone has it in for her?? As above three months, head down, move on. I know it’s not right or fair especially if she enjoys working there but seriously why hang around?

    she no longer enjoys working in the team she is in hence wanting to move to another team….but she wants to leave but feels its going to be difficult going back even for 3 months….half of the team she used to work with have left due to this director and now that she has full control of the team after shafting another co-director the atmosphere there is really bad…

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