Anyone wish they had tried harder at school?

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  • Anyone wish they had tried harder at school?
  • Reading a few of these recent threads about work and so on and reflecting on those kids at school who didn’t really try, in fact mocking those of us who did, i began to wonder what they were doing now and if maybe they might be here.

    So, is there anyone here who fits the description above and do you regret your attitude at school?

    Premier Icon paulosoxo
    Subscriber

    I sometimes wish I’d went to uni instead of becoming an apprentice.

    yossarian
    Member

    I regret not having more confidence at school to follow and explore my abilities. IMO ‘working hard’ is a part of someone’s success, but it isn’t the be all and end all as many seem to think.

    seba560
    Member

    Having seen some of the more intelligent posters here imposing their views on and judging us lesser mortals, I’m glad I had fun.

    tazzymtb
    Member

    Wish I’d tried less, not bothered with the academic route and the world of peer reviewed journals and geekery that I’m now expected to be part of and actually followed what I enjoyed regardless of being told that it would be a “waste of talents and brain”. I wanted to be blacksmith and farrier. 😕

    also very funny to observe the kind of reverse bullying that goes in academia and some forums where the geeks try to impose how very terribly cleaver they are to everyone and take delight in abusing those who do more manual labour. Bit like the abused becoming the abuser. Some of the most truly hideous behaviour to another human being I have seen has been from someone with multiple doctorates and more professional qualifications than you could shake a stick at. a truly vile little man out to get the world for one wedgy too many when he was 10.

    geetee1972
    Member

    I’m very glad I worked hard at school. Others may have had a laugh sitting at the back throwing scissors at us geeks but we are the one laughing now.

    Premier Icon ononeorange
    Subscriber

    Yes, I fit the the first part of the description – at secondary school I gave up and did very little for the last few years. I don’t believe I mocked those that did though, I just stopped and thought that I was so clever. I would like to have a word with my 17-year old self now.

    I can now see how frustrating that must have been, but to have been told on the day that I left by my year tutor that I was worthless and would “be lucky to ever get a job sweeping the streets” was I think excessively harsh and still rankles to this day.

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    hmmmm. As one of those “egg-heads” that did study quite a bit I’d say that putting your nose to the stone neednt mean selling your soul or life. In fact working hard and doing well during those earlyish years (say 12 to 28) now allows me to enjoy all the other things I want to that might not necessarily have been affordable or fund a collection of unnecessary bicycles if I hadnt 🙂

    I;ve enjoyed my education (all GCSEs, A Levels, Bachelors and Masters degrees) and I enjoy the work that they prepared me for. I also now enjoy coppicing and tinkering and bodging and plumbing that they didnt but I can afford to spend time doing.

    Premier Icon scaredypants
    Subscriber

    I’m glad I didn’t work any harder – I did OK but I’m a lazy git at heart. I suspect if I did I’d have ended up in a busier job, spending more money on stuff I’d see less of.

    I think you have to be either very lucky or amazingly clever to make a shitload and even then some of those daft bastards just seem to need to make even more rather than stop and smell the flowers

    Premier Icon Nipper99
    Subscriber

    No, I wouldn’t have become an apprentice agricultural mechanic (which i don’t regret) which would have meant not going to uni in my late 20s and really enjoying the whole learning thing when i was ready for it.

    oliverd1981
    Member

    I sometimes wish I’d went to uni instead of becoming an apprentice.

    I’m glad every day that I did an apprenticeship instead of uni. Though I think apprenticeships are better suited to 18 year olds than 16 year olds. I also think 17 is too young an age to choose a qualification which will effect your entire career.

    I could have got slightly better A-Level grades if I’d pushed myself, I still made it onto the course I thought I wanted to do (Chemical Engineering) but I realise now that I had no idea what that would have lead to a lot of fighting for a decreasing pool of good jobs.

    I’m sure I’d have enjoyed to social side of uni ferociously and much to the detriment of my studies. Living at home and starting a 7am every morning was a great way to save money..

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Not at school but I wish I’d tried a bit harder at uni, I passed and all but I could’ve done better. TBF it wouldn’t have needed that much effort

    Do wish I’d paid some attention in french though, I feel like a right dobber only speaking one language sometimes. On the bright side I can order a Magnum in a french cafe.

    Premier Icon singlespeedstu
    Subscriber

    I had no interest in school but some how seem to have stumbled through ok.

    On the positive side though all those hours i spent out on various different types of bikes when i should have been studying don’t seem to have done me any harm.
    Maybe it’s my parents fault for letting me bunk off school to train on my MX bike.

    Can’t spell for shit but can manual a bike out of sight. 😉

    King-ocelot
    Member

    I wish I would have been allowed to try harder at school. In all honesty my school was far from a suitable place to learn, its changed hugely now after damming inspections. There are a handful of us still in touch in person and on Facebook who have gone on to do well after leaving, all agreeing on the poor quality of the school. I managed to get a place at art college with my ‘natural ability’ if I re-took some GCSE’s, I excelled with proper teaching and went onto university. I wanted to try hard at school, it wasn’t encouraged and there was no discipline, I accept & admit the mistakes I made myself throughout my life, but I was held back during those years. It haunts me still now on application forms my lack of GCSE’s.

    I wish i had worked harder or maybe been pushed harder. I was not expected to acieve much and didnt. Got more a’s at a level than gcse after being kicked out of school. I wanted to be a vet but was laughed at when i mentioned it. Now have a degree, masters and PhD so i dont think it would have been out of the question.

    mooman
    Member

    Not so much as tried harder .. just actually tried a little would have been an improvement ..

    Then again. Doing better than I ever expected/deserved. And The few times I have met some of the nerds/swots from school they still look as miserable as back then .. and 15yrs older than me …. so …

    Dickyboy
    Member

    Fortunately my sister schooled me well in the art of just doing enough work to achieve the desired results 8)

    tazzymtb
    Member

    Fortunately my sister schooled me well in the art of just doing enough work to achieve the desired results

    that sounds soooooooooo wrong!

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    I wish I’d chosen to do what I wanted, rather that what it thought I should…

    willard
    Member

    Yes. Or at the very least, worked harder in my final year at uni in one or two selected exams. That would have made a big difference to me.

    bikebouy
    Member

    Me, well I did ok, nothing fancy, skool led to A Levels led to Uni (after a break) led to work as a middle manager as my first job etc, yadda yadda blah blah to where I am now, I’m happy.

    My Lil Sis left skool with nowt, in fact got kicked out in her last year for having an affair with the Drama Teacher (cough) she started a family after meeting her hubby then took an OU Maths degree which she did amazingly well in (top 10 in the country) which led to Uni (Cambridge) where she did a Masters in Advanced Maths (again top 10 in the country) which led to a Doctorate in Maths which led to becoming a Headmistress.. She’s happy.

    The way I see it is this, most folks have some amazing skill, not everyone is academic, we should cater for that in this world of ours.

    Premier Icon singlespeedstu
    Subscriber

    The way I see it is this, most folks have some amazing skill, not everyone is academic

    Nail hit clean on head. 🙂

    Some of the most interesting people i’ve met have hardly any formal qualifications.

    Some of the most interesting people i’ve met have hardly any formal qualifications.

    Do you have many yourself?

    wait4me
    Member

    I didn’t start to grow up until I was at least 30, so what hope did I have at 16? Would like to have gone to uni (not the half arsed mature student bit I attempted upon growing up), but all told, I’m pretty happy with where I’ve ended up even if job and prospects are pretty dire.

    I’m left wondering if people’s views depnd to some degree on when they left school and if it is ifact an age thing

    tacopowell
    Member

    I was the class clown, didn’t apply myself, got shit GCSE’s and spent the next 10 years doing drugs, Wish I’d applied myself!

    Could be a Astronaut or Professor?!

    Probably not but No doubt I’d be in a better position!

    bikebouy
    Member

    No not really, I was in a group of proper nerds and academic types when I was at skool, I didn’t follow that crowd, I just did my own thing. I was at a Grammar Skool, but even that I don’t think has any baring on academic ability.

    It’s been a mad last ten years what with the then Govt ploughing the trough of “your only choice is go to Uni” I’ve seen 16yr olds freak out over not attaining A* ‘ s when they’ve gotten Plain old A’s.. That to me isn’t healthy.

    I wonder what the next ten years will be like, what with the massive cost of going to Uni means to those that would like to go, but can’t afford it.

    I’m glad I don’t have to go to Uni now.

    Premier Icon ononeorange
    Subscriber

    Charlie – that’s a good observation. I think it’s an age thing.

    When you’re a kid out of school you do think that you’re the bees knees and that you have a great insight into life that no-one else does, but as get older you get more disillusioned and part of that I think gets turned against your younger, naive self. As I get older I feel increasingly more disappointed in what I have failed to do in life (and in my case increasingly bitter about what I must have been to warrant that comment from my teacher).

    TuckerUK
    Member

    More a case of wishing my mental illness (Bipolar Disorder) had been diagnosed and treated when my parents first raised concerns. I hated school, despite being pretty bright, and I find learning and education so much fun now as an adult.

    Premier Icon teethgrinder
    Subscriber

    Academically- no.

    With some of the girls – yes.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    I was a girlie swot at school, complete with all the socially awkward nerd stereotypes that go with that.

    It was at University where the wheels came off. I grew up a lot in terms of personal development, but academia suffered. There’s a lot of things I’d change if I got the opportunity to do over my Uni days, but there’s also a lot of things I’m grateful for.

    In fact, thinking about it, “right people, wrong course” about sums up my Uni days.

    college is more key than school, university is better when you are older, the only thing i instill into my kids is that you do need maths/english and even if you do not have a plan when you leave school do something at college that will give you an employable skill even if its just a jo in the summer and sod of surfing/skiing in the winter… er, like i did.

    i don’t regeret what i didnt do at school, i think its a shame the school did not care enough to explain things certain better. for instance in pe we got sent running around the field for the first 30mins of the hour session so the teachers could have a fag. if they had explained why that 30min run could benefit your life it would have been more meaningful.

    but hell, i left school 30 years ago. from where i am now, it does not matter one bit.

    Duffer
    Member

    Personally, i wasted every minute of my education. Left school at the age of sixteen with practically nothing. I’m not about to blame anyone else for my failings, but somewhere between my home life / schooling, something went drastically wrong.

    Fortunately, i met a good woman at the age of 17 and turned things around! I joined the RAF (that soon makes you grow up) and started a family (that also soon makes you grow up). I’m now trying my best to learn from all the mistakes that were made during my upbringing, and apply those lessons with my own children. It seems to be working, too; they’re both wonderful kids!

    Me: Children, would you like some Cake?
    Children: No thanks, Dad. Can we have some Grapes instead, please?

    Do i wish i’d tried harder at school? Definitely. On the upside, i can make a Forkilft dance like a Ballerina!

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    You can also string a sentence together, unlike a lot of people. I wouldn’t say your school days were a complete waste.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    I don’t wish I’d tried harder, just wish I’d had the balls to stand up for myself when it came to taking my options and done the two subjects I was top of the year in, rather than going for subjects I was assured would be “better” for me in the long run. I only work hard at things that actually interest me, rather than things I “probably need”

    There was actually a conversation when my parents and teachers agreed that there was no future in History. 🙄

    tiggs121
    Member

    I do – I might not be back there teaching right now! Same school btw!

    Duffer
    Member

    You can also string a sentence together, unlike a lot of people. I wouldn’t say your school days were a complete waste.

    Fanks 4 da complyment!

    On a more serious note, i’ve made the effort over the last few years to try and better educate myself; if i’m expected to educate my children, it’s only right.

    I’ve even started reading those… What’re they called again…? Papery things, words on them…

    Books! That’s it!

    tazzymtb
    Member

    Some of the most interesting people i’ve met have hardly any formal qualifications.

    I’s agree with this whole heartedly. Life creates far more interesting characters than academia.

    the other thing I’ve discovered so far on my bimble through life is that in a lot of parts of the world, those with the least to give are the most willing to share and help strangers. The UK seems have lost it’s way somewhere (particularly 80’s onwards) where it’s more about status and one-upmanship than the appreciation that we’re all in this one way ride together, so we may as well just be excellent to each other. Seeing my son at school now and the attempts to bring more people skills empathy for others and communication skills in, hopefully will mean that he’ll grow up a bit more appreciative that all people have worth, not just the clever ones, or the ones with loads of money.

    piemonster
    Member

    Knowing what I do now, no.

    I still enjoy making up my GCSE grades on job applications, no actual idea what they are any more. Average iirc. Tediously average.

    piemonster
    Member

    Bloody school, think of all those years I wasted. Could have been watching telly, gits.

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