12 mile commute to work….what to buy?

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  • 12 mile commute to work….what to buy?
  • loddrik
    Member

    I just had this choice as I bought a road bike for commuting and was surprised how quick they are. However I have just sold the road bike and am using my ht with rigid forks and slicks. Much more comfortable with risers and can go up and down kerbs when required, no need to worry about potholes and disc brakes are great in the wet. Whilst it is not quite as quick, it is much more suited to the city and my commute.

    silverpigeon
    Member

    Agree with loddrik. I've gone back to a rigid Mtb with 1.5 slicks, flat bar and bar ends. Not as quick in a straight line as my road bike but easier to weave in and out of traffic, plus accelerates quicker from the lights and up short climbs. I did put road gears on it – 38/50 chainrings and 12-25 cassette

    ojom
    Member

    i want an Arc-X.

    Premier Icon midlifecrashes
    Subscriber

    My solution, Giant SCR2, 26mm tyres, guards and rack. Equivalent Defy would do the same job. Crosstop levers handy in traffic, but otherwise standard. That Trek in the classifieds would be bang on.

    samuri
    Member

    I'd buy a map so I could work out a longer route than the 12 miles. I'd also get a cross bike. Commutes are meant to be as much offroad as possible. Your new map will help you here.

    samuri
    Member

    However I have just sold the road bike and am using my ht with rigid forks and slicks. Much more comfortable with risers and can go up and down kerbs when required, no need to worry about potholes and disc brakes are great in the wet. Whilst it is not quite as quick, it is much more suited to the city and my commute.

    And right there is where a cross bike comes in. As fast as a road bike on the road, can be ridden offroad and up and down kerbs. Comfy too.

    west kipper
    Member

    Being able to ride up and down kerbs seems to be a major worry for people looking at on road bikes. Where are all these kerbs (I assume we're not riding on the pavement then) that are too high for a wee bunnyhop? Most road bikes will put up with a surprising amount if you use a touch of finesse.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I've got the use of my brother's Revolution Courier Race, it's a brilliant thing, basically a hybrid but erring more on the road bike side. Lovely once I stuck less skinny bars on it, 8 speed which is enough for my hilly commute, 700c rims, reasonably weight… Nice familiar feel to it when coming off a mountain bike.

    Money goes a long way on road bikes and hybrids, something like this or a Carrera Subway is really more than enough for noncompetitive road riding. Most commuters are doing it on supermarket BSOs and ancient rigid mtbs they found in their garages one day after all. Or a Carrera Gryphon or Boardman Howevermuchyouwanttospend.

    joemarshall
    Member

    Being able to ride up and down kerbs seems to be a major worry for people looking at on road bikes. Where are all these kerbs (I assume we're not riding on the pavement then) that are too high for a wee bunnyhop?

    And why is everyone riding up and down kerbs anyway? Ride on the road, like a car, it's faster 99% of the time than taking all the dodgy shortcuts.

    The other thing that confuses me is people saying they prefer flat bars for weaving in and out of traffic. Flat bars are a nightmare in traffic, a nice narrow set of drop bars is what you want – so you're no wider than your shoulders – you can squeeze through on the overtaking much better, and I really don't understand not being able to turn tight enough – I can't remember any situation where I've wanted to do a turn I couldn't do on a road bike, if anything they are a bit more nimble at turning surely? I reckon most of it is just not being used to drop bars.

    I've commuted for years, in Surrey, Central London, Nottingham, and now across Derbyshire, none of those times have I thought, aha, what I want now is a wider set of bars without the comfy drops for going fast on?

    Joe

    Bagstard
    Member

    It all comes down to the route you take. My commute is either a horrible grind along dual carriageways with lorries rattling past me or a much more pleasent route along bumpy country lanes and rough, wet leaf strewn cycle paths.

    I tried a boardman hybrid on the roads which was pretty quick, but opted for GT ZUM hybrid and my usual 710mm sunline bars for a much more enjoyable and confident journey. This also means I can use my ipod when I get to the cycle paths.

    Bagstard

    mieszko
    Member

    I had a CX Crosslight and it was ok for a commute but as I only have two bikes Crosslight had to double up as my road bike. No mounts for bottle cages or mounts for full mudguards so had to use some p-clips. Also sometimes when the going got fast the 48t chainring was not enough with the wider spread cassette (28 biggest). Bike was very good but had it's flaws and I wasn't using it's CX potential. Now however I got a Trek 1200, mudguard fittings on frame and fork, longer TT than Crosslight for the same 56cm frame, Tiagra setup and with new wheels and some finishing kit it weights just over 19lb for road mode. Commuter option is heavier but I've got full sks guards, 25mm tyres no problem, saddlebag for tubes and tools and is still only around 21-22lb with solid punctureproof tyres. I could fit a rear rack as well but it would cost to much for how often I use it so just use a backpack. The bike just works and is good for commuting duties as well as some longer rides.

    Get a road bike with guards fittings on frame and fork as it's a must if You ride in all weather. My commute is only around 6 miles one way but as much as I love my mountain bike it's easier to ride the road bike plus You'll get loads more life out of a road bike drivetrain than an mtb one. SS setup would probably be even cheaper to run, easier to maintain. I did 2x much miles on my road bike than on the mtb this year and the chain isn't even stretched to 0.5 and my mtb one had to be recently changed as it was on 0.75.
    I would like to have an almost maintainance free SS road bike for winter but that would have to be my 3rd bike as I do like to have gears on my road bike.

    steve_b77
    Member

    May I once again mention a Boardman Hybrid 😆

    for the commute and C2W i bought a specialized tricross comp in the sales @ £899.
    it's bloody brilliant actually !
    carbon stay and fork with zertz and it handles offroad relatively well.
    only problem is the V brakes fited don't permit guard fitment but specialized me some canti brakes FOC !
    incredible CS.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    "I reckon most of it is just not being used to drop bars."

    Thing is, you see a lot of commuters on bikes with drops, but I very very rarely see anyone actually using them, most people seem to wobble along using the flats which is just the worst of all worlds. I'd sooner have narrow-ish flats, 580mm or so is barely wider than even my puny shoulders.

    Having said that, I think the only really convincing reason not to use drops is if you don't like them.

    alwyn
    Member

    That's my commuter and I love it!

    Clips and a big gear, perfect for a 12 mile commute 🙂

    alwyn – no guards ? how do you cope with getting saturated ?

    alwyn
    Member

    I have a mud guard on the back, I just hang my lycra up in the office to dry. If I just wear shorts so I have to cycle really fast to keep warm, ending up a faster cyclist.

    lol @ alwyn 😀

    Saccades
    Member

    i'm using a SS pompino atm, but after the success of the alfine on my MTB, I'm getting one for the pomp too.

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