Free ‘Singletrack’ Art Exhibition in Sheffield

by
June 8, 2016

A new mountain bike sculpture exhibition is open in Sheffield which suitably features a piece named “Singletrack”.

The Mayne man in action
The Mayne man in action

The exhibition – called “Into the Wild”, created by sculptor and rider David Mayne –  runs up until June 25th at the Cupola Gallery in Sheffield and guess what? It’s completely free.

singletrack sculpture
Arty

With a number of sculptures on show it’s not just about cycling. Artist David Mayne has themed the exhibition around all things wild and outdoor.

“David has a lifelong passion with nature and landscape – from early days of climbing and hill walking to mountain biking and fell running,” reads the event description.

“He now lives in Holmfirth near areas of stunning woodland and wild and beautiful hills and moorland. The work he now creates is a response to this landscape and his past adventures within it.”

Singletrack sculpture
Neat piece of art, even neater name

More information on the exhibition can be found here.

About the Artist –

Since graduating from Sheffield Polytechnic in 1986 David Mayne has developed his work from raw assemblage with found objects to the much more refined pieces he now creates. One thing has remained constant – the use of metal. David started using steel after visiting one of the (then) many scrap yards in Sheffield and was instantly drawn to the colour and texture of discarded metal.

David has a lifelong passion with nature and landscape – from early days of climbing and hill walking to mountain biking and fell running. He now lives in Holmfirth near areas of stunning woodland and wild and beautiful hills and moorland. The work he now creates is a response to the landscape and his past adventures within it.

David Mayne
Mayne after some seriously intense cyclo-cross training

“I got back into cycling in my 30’s and wish it was something that I started at a much earlier age.

First race and first bike. Around 1997- Wharncliffe Woods – I was in the novice stage and rocked up on my fully ridged steel Rockhopper complete with toe clips and fell running trainers. A quick look around at the start and strangely enough I was the only one using this system – and probably the only true novice. I wasn’t last but it certainly was a baptism of fire. I was hooked.

Worst result? Lee quarry sometime between 2009 -2012. I’ve wiped it from my mind. Entered into the elite cross country race by my wife as a gift – “you’re quite fit aren’t you” – “er only compared to normal people and those that don’t really exercise much” I remember the start and noticed there seemed to be a few bikes with team GB decals … oh dear this is going to hurt …. It did, right from the uphill start that the rest of the field didn’t appear to notice. How is it possible to set off so fast uphill ? They were off like the proverbial whippets and the next time I saw the race again was when it was lapping me. If only I had persuaded my wife that I was still a novice …..I may have finally got a result.

Hardest race, and biggest disappointment? Without doubt the 2012 Kielder Montane 100. Got timed out at the final check point.by something like 11 minutes. At the time …for a couple of minutes it was just relief that the suffering was over but this was followed (and still is) by disappointment and self analysis – why did I spend so much time at all those early feed stations etc etc. Months of training and 78 miles completed all for nothing. It took about a week to recover (well physically as still not quite over the disappointment).

Current Bikes? 1997 Specialized Rockhopper – seen better days (but who hasn’t) 1998 Raleigh R200 road bike 1999 Marin East Peak Full Suspension 2013 Giant TCX 3 – out of the box cyclocross/road bike. In lots of ways my favourite bike (sorry Stumpjumper FSR Comp you were great while you lasted) 2016 – First sculpture featuring a bike. Hopefully more to follow.

How much time on the bike? not enough.”

When he is not working on exhibitions and private commissions, Mayne continues his practice as a sculptor working in the public realm, creating landmark features for local authorities, visitor centres, large scale PLCs and health trusts. Clients include Carilion Civil Engineering, Taylor Wimpey, British Waterways and the sustainable transport charity Sustrans, Leeds University and Marks and Spencer.

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