Parts with personality: Rew10Works’ dual-tube stem

Plus updated Nishiki and Hite Rite dropper

Just a beautiful piece of kit

Just a beautiful piece of kit

While their focus is clearly on the road and urban side of cycling, there are a handful of items on Tokyo-based Rew10Works’ Flickr photostream that beg to be shared.  Take the dual-tube stem above and below.  Fillet brazed from steel, the stem looks like something that could have come out of the early-’90s mountain bike explosion- if we hadn’t all been so besotted with the CNC mill.  The steerer clamp is tucked nicely out of the way in the style of some older road frames’ seatstay-mounted seatpost clamps.

What a view

Not a bad view.

It’s probably not the lightest or stiffest way to build a stem but there’s something to be said for doing something with, as Rew10 puts it, “personality.”  Not one to take the easy route, Rew10 notes that the stem took twice as long to build as a custom fork.  Still, it would be a lovely thing to look down on while riding and we understand his reluctance to ship it to its new owner.

Classic frame- without the 'classic' brakes

Classic frame- without the ‘classic’ brakes

Over on the dirt, “Mr. HND’s” Nishsiki Revolution has dipped a toe in the 21st century with disc brakes and a modern suspension fork.  While the original 26in wheels have been retained, a new head tube was grafted on, starting and ending higher than the original, allowing for a straight-steerer 1 1/8in fork to be fitted and the handlebars to sit in a more modern location.

The original dropper post

The original dropper post

The best part of the refurb may well be the updated Hite Rite-style dropper post.  A dedicated mount sits at the back of the seat tube, with with brass washers keeping the spring moving smoothly.  Above, the usual stamped steel spring mount was replaced with a more robust brazed version.  In a classy move, the seat tube and bottom bracket mounted pump pegs remain- though most frame pumps were nowhere near as good as we might remember.  All this bike needs now is an appropriately ’90s coat of paint.

rew10.com

via Chirosangku

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