Stanforth bikes take inspiration from Kilimanjaro

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Inspired by early pioneers, built for urban expeditions…

Enduro, before it was cool
Enduro, before it was cool

Inspired, it is said, by Richard and Nicholas Crane’s bicycle-enable 1985 conquest of Mt. Kilimanjaro, the Stanforth Kibo “designed as much for the daily commute as for all terrain global touring.”  The young brand is helmed by Simon Stanforth, son and nephew of Paul and Rick Stanforth- early owners of Saracen.  Hand built in the UK by Lee Cooper, the Kibo is a Reynolds 631 frame with an appearance (check those chainstays!) that recalls the early days of mountain biking.  A full compliment of bosses allows for for three bottle cages, front and rear racks, and mudguards.

Set time machine for 1985
Set time machine for 1985

The Shimano Deore drivetrain, Sturmey Archer thumb shifters, Nitto quill stem, MKS pedals, and Genetic cantis are hardly affectations- all are durable and readily-serviced.  Eyeletted Rigida Sputnik rims are laced in the UK, using 36 spokes apiece, to serviceable Deore hubs.  A leather Brooks B17 really was the only possible saddle choice.

Quill stem and four-finger levers?  Ooh yes.
Quill stem and four-finger levers? Ooh yes.

An altogether unique machine, the Stanforth Kilo comes in a durable black powder coat.  Despite its UK manufacture and high-end spec, complete bikes sell for a reasonable £1,395.  More at stanforthbikes.co.uk.

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Comments (4)

    Lovely craftsmanship. But I fail to undertand why anyone would want to ride this bike, other than some kind of quite expensive pose. Early mountain bikes were a piece of crap. Of course, I loved mine at the time, but today’s bikes are infinitely better.

    Nice, but ruined by the white tyres. Should be skinwalls.
    I imagine it would do very well as a tough, urban commuter or tourer.

    Don’t understand why anyone would buy that.
    There were some tasty early mountainbikes, but not of that era. Threaded headset with cable hanger and swan-neck stem? No thanks!
    Way overpriced too.
    Oh yeah – the tyres are truly awful too.

    This bike is a lugged, 631 Reynolds steel frame, bosses all over it with a relaxed geometry so to speak, Simplicity in the threaded head set classic quil stem, and 26″ wheels. Hec, you want this bike if your a serious tourer or round the world person.

    Frame breaks, someone can weld it, wheels go, you can always find a 26″ wheel. My buddy in 1985?, won the Mammoth Ca. downhill on a Schwinn Cimmaron and set the new speed record of 62.5 MPH on a rigid frame! Team Ape was the name of their team out of Chatsworth, Ca and all the riders were over 6’tall and over 200pds. I like this bike.

    Not for every one, but I think it would be your go to bike if things got tricky.

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